The New York Times, keeping support for free expression at arms length when it appears President Trump may employ it for his reelection campaign. The paper was alarmed by Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg, who announced that Facebook would not serve a privatized Ministry of Truth for political ads in 2020, no matter how much the Times (representing the aggrieved Democratic Party) may whine. Cecilia Kang and Mike Isaac listened to Zuckerberg’s speech Thursday at Georgetown University and filed “Defiant Zuckerberg Says Facebook Won’t Police Political Speech -- In an address at Georgetown University, the Facebook chief executive called for more free speech -- not less -- as his company has been assailed for allowing lies and falsehoods to appear.”



Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg did some that should not be considered remarkable on Thursday, but given the current political context was- having listened to the concerns of others regarding free speech, he decided not appoint himself the final arbiter of truth. However, this left the media out in the cold, if Zuckerberg won't take down that anti-Biden Trump ad, who will? Fortunately for the media, Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff has a book to sell and is willing to play the role.



On Friday, both NBC’s Today show and CBS This Morning labeled Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s decision not to censor political speech on the social network as “controversial.” The coverage emphasized that 2020 Democratic candidates were particularly upset by move, after trying to pressure Facebook into banning ads from the President Trump’s reelection campaign.



The left was not pleased with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s decision to promote the value of “free expression.” After Zuckerberg gave a speech at Georgetown University, where he disavowed expanding the definition of hate speech and defended Facebook’s new policies for political ads, Democrats came after both him and the social media platform.



Facebook and its developers have been in the race to define and correct what the platform calls hate speech. But in a speech given to Georgetown University, CEO Mark Zuckerberg suggested a different direction for the company.



On her Monday show, MSNBC Live host Katy Tur theorized that the future of Facebook as a company is very much up in the air. The latest controversy surrounding the social media company? CEO Mark Zuckerberg dared to talk to conservatives and yield to Elizabeth Warren's demands.



On Tuesday, CBS This Morning noted liberal outrage over reports that Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has been conducting meetings with conservative leaders. Surprisingly, co-host and Democratic donor Gayle King was quick to defend the practice, asking, “What’s wrong with that?”



Democrats want to persecute any business, person, or group that has helped or even simply not hindered President Donald Trump. Even top social media companies. Senator and Democratic candidate Elizabeth Warren came after Facebook on Twitter on Oct. 7, for “help[ing] elect Donald Trump once” and for labeling her own campaign as “an ‘existential’ threat to Facebook.”



Facebook admitted in court that it is a private publisher, not a free platform, proving its conservative critics correct. Conservative pundit Chadwick Moore tweeted an article by tech blog ReclaimTheNet, writing, “Facebook just admitted in a federal document that they are, indeed, a publisher, not a platform, and they are demanding First Amendment protections from Laura Loomer's defamation lawsuit.” The upshot: “This means, Mark Zuckerberg lied to Congress.”



Facebook is having a hard time with transparency, even after paying for researchers to look at its data … with transparency. Philanthropies that agreed to fund studies about Facebook are even threatening to quit. Facebook had promised to make certain sets of data available to researchers working for the organizations, which included the Koch Foundation and Omidyar Network.



Ready for a handful of liberal news sources and a maybe a conservative or two? How about a computer program that chooses what stories you should read? Facebook’s upcoming “News Tab” already sounds suspect. Especially, in light of previous attempts by the company to control its news feed. Facebook “will pay dozens of publishers to license content for News Tab, and news from many more will be included.” In Axios’ exact words “A small team of journalists will pick stories for a Top News section.” 



A lawsuit against Facebook has ended in a loss for the massive social media platform. Reuters reported that a federal court ruled against Facebook, declaring that it illegally collected and stored biometric data of users without their consent. Shawn Williams, the lawyer representing the plaintiffs, said “This biometric data is so sensitive that if it is compromised, there is simply no recourse.