On Friday's Across the America with Carol Costello on HLN, during a discussion of the political reaction to the murder of Mollie Tibbetts by an illegal immigrant, liberal CNN commentator Maria Cardona misleadingly claimed that most crimes are committed by white men.



As the dominant media have been fixated for the past week on the Trump administration stepping up prosecutions against non-citizens who cross illegally into the U.S., resulting in parents being separated from children during detention as required by law, CNN and MSNBC both repeatedly conflated asylum seekers who legally got through the proper procedure with those who cross the border illegally first before pursuing asylum after being apprehended. When DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen earlier this week called out the misreporting and insisted that legal asylum seekers are normally not detained or separated from their children, except in unusual circumstances, the liberal networks scoffed at her admonishment and then pivoted to complaining that the legal process of applying for asylum at ports of entry takes too long.



During a CNN panel debate Sunday on whether or not Samantha Bee deserved to be compared to Roseanne Barr, host Brian Stelter and his liberal guests somehow turned the conversation back to blame Trump for the female comedians’ offensive comments.

 


Immediately following President Donald Trump’s fiery campaign rally in Phoenix, Arizona on Tuesday, CNN completely dropped their thin façade of an objective news organization. In the wake of the address, there were many cries on CNN Tonight accusing the President of being truly out of his mind and unfit to hold the office of the president. Host Don Lemon declared that Trump was “clearly trying to ignite a civil war in this country.” But he wasn’t the only one who was off the wall.



The same network that made a lewd sex joke about conservatives in 2009 is now outraged over a innocuous comment made about Ivanka Trump on Fox News Tuesday, that many on the left accused of being sexual. Wednesday night, CNN host Don Lemon hosted a whole panel on the “sexist” and “misogynistic” comment made by FNC’s Jesse Waters on the day before’s The Five, about Ivanka Trump’s voice.



On CNN Thursday night, the proverbial moving of the goal posts regarding the Jeff Sessions situation was on full display, shifting from demanding recusal in Russian investigations to resignation and calls for charges of perjury and treason.



On Friday at CNN, a clearly upset Don Lemon, covering a topic that almost no one in the press cared about for eight years during the Obama administration, abruptly ended a segment about the costs of protecting President Donald Trump and the First Family, and began to walk away from the set before the next commercial break began. Why? One of his panelists called the obsession with these costs "fake news." The panelist who set Lemon off, Paris Dennard, who describes himself as "a GOP political commentator and consultant," got Lemon's goat when he stood his ground despite pressure from Lemon and ridicule from two of the other three panelists.



As liberal CNN commentators Bakari Sellers and Maria Cardona appeared as panel members on Tuesday's CNN Tonight to react to a report by CNN's Tom Foreman mostly recalling sexual assault victims who have made complaints about abuse by Bill and Hillary Clinton, both denied that Hillary had been caught laughing about successfully defending a child rapist in spite of the existence of an audio recording of just that.

And, in spite of the fact that Foreman's report dealt mostly with sexual assault victims, Sellers feebly began by trying to use the standard liberal argument that Hillary Clinton had the right to be angry at women who had "cheated" with her husband. Conservative CNN political commentator Kayleigh McEnany had to job of taking them both on with little assistance from other panel members, with Sellers and Cardona calling some of the charges against Hillary "not true" and "a lie."



When Jeff Zucker became president of CNN earlier this month, some people in the mainstream media feared that this might be the end of “the last bastion of television journalism” since the former head of NBC Universal was expected to make many significant changes in the network personnel and schedule.

Those changes took off on Tuesday, when ABC's Chris Cuomo, who had served as the news anchor on “Good Morning America” from 2006 to 2009 and then moved on to the "20/20" prime-time program, was reported to “have a major role in a new CNN morning show and across the network, anchoring and reporting on major events.”



CNN contributor Maria Cardona may have forgotten some history as she tried to spin away President Obama's troubles in the Arkansas and Kentucky Democratic primaries. Cardona, speaking during the 10 a.m. hour of Wednesday's Newsroom, argued that "Arkansas and Kentucky have never been hotbeds of the Democratic Party."

President Obama only picked up 58 percent of the vote in the Kentucky Democratic primary, and 60 percent in Arkansas. "Look, Arkansas and Kentucky have never been hotbeds of the Democratic Party. There's no real infrastructure there. There's no organization by the Obama campaign there," Cardona insisted.



For information on one of Herman Cain's accusers, CNN interviewed her former boss on Wednesday – who just also happened to be a former Clinton advisor and a  Democratic strategist at present. Not surprisingly, interviewee Maria Cardona gave the accuser, Karen Kraushaar, a giant thumbs-up and told CNN that Kraushaar had referred to her old boss Herman Cain as a "monster."

Anchor Kyra Phillips never mentioned that Cardona was a Democratic strategist or a former Clinton advisor, and failed to question her if she had any underlying political motive in the case. CNN flashed the title of "Democratic Strategist" under Cardona's name for nine seconds during the interview which lasted over four minutes.



Harry Smith and John McCain, CBS Near the end of an interview with Arizona Senator John McCain on Tuesday's CBS Early Show, co-host Harry Smith turned to the subject of illegal immigration and the new Arizona law to combat it: "a very tough immigration reform bill which basically makes it illegal for you to be in the state without some sort of documentation. Is this law the answer to the immigration crisis?"

McCain noted the number of illegal immigrants entering Arizona and the level of drug trafficking taking place: "Across the Tucson sector of Arizona last year, there was 241,000 apprehensions of illegal immigrants....1.3 million pounds of marijuana intercepted on the Tucson border just last year." Smith followed up by wondering: "And for the millions of Hispanic Americans who live in Arizona, what do you say to them who feel like this bill is purely discriminatory?"

In a news brief on the topic at the top of the 8AM ET hour, fill-in news reader Betty Nguyen described how: "The Obama administration and activists are considering legal challenges to Arizona's new immigration enforcement law, which has reignited a national debate." A series of signs from an immigration protest in San Francisco appeared on screen: "Latinos Today, Who's Next? Shame on Arizona;" "Boycott Arizona;" "Brown Is Not A Crime."As footage of the protest rolled, Nguyen explained: "The law makes it a crime to be an illegal immigrant." On Monday, an MSNBC headline made the same odd statement.

On Monday's CBS Evening News, correspondent John Blackstone argued: "many feel the sting of racism in the new law."