Even though few political campaigns are underway this year, the gubernatorial contests in New Jersey and Virginia have drawn the attention of the All Things Considered weekday program on the liberal, taxpayer-funded National Public Radio network. Host Ari Shapiro began a segment on Tuesday, October 31, by stating: “The Republican candidates in both of these states have released attack ads claiming the Democratic opponents would not enforce immigration laws and would endanger people living in those states.”


Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders rails against the “billionaire class” and has called income inequality “the greatest moral issue of our time,” but the senator from Vermont is “not exactly a man of modest means,” according to an article written by Kerri Anne Renzulli for the TIME magazine website.

However, “nothing about Bernie’s net worth devalues his progressive beliefs,” stated Peter Daou, a former adviser to Hillary Clinton who responded on the Blue Nation Review website to reports that Sanders and his wife, Jane, could retire with an “effective retirement nest egg” valued at “nearly $2 million.”


Thursday on The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore, a panel discussed the 2016 presidential election, taking shots at both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton in the process. Actor and comedian Michael Rapaport slammed Donald Trump, suggesting he has a “ strong, old school, slave owner mentality.” He added: “[H]e told the Latinos, you're this, you’re that, you’re this and I’m gonna win your – and you’re gonna vote for me! That's slave owner 101, and people are like, keep going! Because the middle of the country is like, we feel the same way.”


On Tuesday's Morning Joe, the Washington Post’s Eugene Robinson attacked the Republican Party for “going way, way, way to the right on abortion.” The columnist based this opinion on Marco Rubio’s refusal to rule out voting for a bill that wouldn't have exceptions for cases of rape or incest. No word from Robinson about a move to the left in the Democratic Party despite a surge in the polls from self-avowed socialist Bernie Sanders.


In a recent piece for Slate, Mark Joseph Stern argued that videos released showing Planned Parenthood to be trafficking fetal body parts gives him hope. Is it the possible defunding of the ‘reproductive health’ organization that gives him hope, you might ask? Nope. Stern opined: “The graphic images of aborted fetuses are meant to disgust me, to convince me that abortion is a barbaric act of killing. But I don’t see death in these videos. I see hope.” Later in the piece, after outlining the supposed medical benefits, he claimed abortion “is not an act of killing. It is an act of altruism.”


Wednesday night on All In, MSNBC's Chris Hayes invited Planned Parenthood executive vice president Dawn Laguens to the program to discuss the videos released by the Center for Medical Progress. Seemingly not too concerned with the selling of fetal baby parts, Hayes wondered if there was “some sense” that the “reproductive health” organization has “been infiltrated. I mean, are there security concerns?”


Last night on Hardball, Chris Matthews hit the Republicans Party for having “this love affair with anger.” In a panel discussion on the 2016 Republican race for the nomination, the MSNBC personality explained that part of Donald Trump’s appeal is that the Republicans are “an angry party.” Matthews thought it unlikely that the party in its current state could nominate an establishment figure like Jeb Bush.


On Monday’s Last Word, Lawrence O’Donnell started his program with a panel discussing Mike Huckabee’s controversial comments about the Iran deal. Daily Beast columnist and MSNBC contributor Jonathan Alter had harsh words for the Republicans, claiming their rhetoric is far worse when compared to the Democrats: “[T]here's a vileness gap that is developing between our political parties.” The ex-Newsweek reporter charged:  “They don't talk this way in the Democratic Party. That's not a partisan comment. It's an examination of the record and the rhetoric.”


In a Sunday post, Washington Monthly blogger Martin Longman charged that a combination of unyielding ideological extremism and efforts to prevent many who might oppose said extremism from voting mean that the Republican party’s creed has “really beg[un] to resemble fascism.”

Longman noted that the DNC recently announced a campaign designed to find and register likely Democratic voters and remarked that while that project is “certainly in [Democrats’] self-interest…it’s also wholly consistent with traditional American values about...the right of everyone to vote…There is no corresponding effort to prevent likely Republican voters from registering to vote or to kick registered Republicans off the voter rolls.”