The right’s widely varied response to Donald Trump’s presidential bid may be the political story of the year so far, but many liberals have ignored it in favor of arguing that Trump’s worldview is a pure product of conservatism. For example, in a Sunday article, Chauncey DeVega claimed that Trump is “the logical result of at least five decades of Republican political strategy” and defined Trumpmania as “a mass political temper tantrum on the Right caused by a potent mix of authoritarianism and racism.”

“Much of the rhetoric, policies, and goals of the Republican Party and Donald Trump in 2016 are disturbingly similar to those of…the Ku Klux Klan,” declared DeVega. “This should be no surprise. The Republican Party is the United States’ largest de facto white identity organization. Conservatism and racism is now one and the same thing in the American post civil rights era.”



Appearing as a guest on Tuesday's Legal View with Ashleigh Banfield, far-left CNN political commentator Sally Kohn oddly brought up the Indiana Ku Klux Klan from the 1920s as evidence of the state being "socially conservative" and "racially divisive," and therefore a place where GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump is likely to win by a landslide.

Her analysis was so bizarre that even the left-leaning Ashleigh Banfield stepped in to "stick up for" Indiana residents who "would absolutely disavow that."



Appearing as a guest on Saturday's Smerconish show, CNN political commentator Errol Louis -- political anchor for Time Warner Cable News -- began the segment by blaming Donald Trump for violence by left-wing protesters near his appearances, and concluded the segment with an admittedly "snarky" comment as he sarcastically praised Trump because "he hasn't been endorsed by any Ku Klux Klan leaders lately, so that's one nice thing."



“President Obama went to Saudi Arabia for the Persian Gulf Summit. Aides say he was disappointed because when he agreed to participate, he thought it was the Persian Golf Summit.” - NewsBusted’s Jody Miller



Reviewing the premiere of liberal CNN comedian W. Kamau Bell’s new show United Shades of America in Monday’s Washington Post, critic Stephanie Merry gushed over Bell’s consistent behavior as “[a] teddy bear of a guy” who’s “relentlessly easygoing” with the first episode being dedicated to hanging out with the Ku Klux Klan (since, of course, they’re supposedly “the core” of the Republican Party).



White nationalist and anti-Semite David Duke recently urged listeners to his radio show to vote for Donald Trump and to volunteer for Trump’s campaign. For Republicans, that’s pretty much business as usual, argued Chauncey DeVega in a Sunday article for Daily Kos.

“In the post-civil rights era conservatism and racism are one and the same thing. Because of that dynamic, the Republican Party is the United States’ largest white identity organization,” DeVega claimed. “Donald Trump is the hell spawn of decades of Republican racism and white supremacy. They can try to deny their bastard child…but the world will still know his parentage.”



On Thursday's New Day on CNN, during a discussion of Donald Trump's hesitancy to condemn former KKK leader David Duke, CNN co-anchor Alisyn Camerota used the controversy to bring up other alleged racial issues from the past, including Ronald Reagan on "welfare queens" in 1976 and the Willie Horton ads against Democrat Michael Dukakis in 1988. Guest Michael Eric Dyson repeated an old discredited charge that Reagan employed a racist dog whistle by beginning his 1980 presidential campaign in a Mississippi city where an infamous anti-civil rights murder took place 16 years earlier.



Appearing as a guest on Wednesday's CNN Newsroom with Carol Costello, supposedly right-leaning actor, economist and former Nixon speech writer Ben Stein praised socialist presidential candidate Bernie Sanders's plan for national health care, and even admitted to a "fondness" for former law school classmate Hillary Clinton as he mused about whom he might support for President. It was only after being prodded that he finally admitted he prefers Republican Marco Rubio of all the candidates, although he aimed blunt criticism at both Rubio and Ted Cruz even while admitting to liking them both.



Appearing as a guest on Tuesday's Legal View with Ashleigh Banfield, liberal CNN political commentator and Daily Beast editor-in-chief John Avlon tried to blame the KKK on the "conservative movement" and lectured conservative CNN political commentator and NewsBusters contributor Jeffrey Lord that "you need to own that cancer at the heart of the conservative movement right now because that is -- we are reaping what you have sown for decades."



If Joe Scarborough were ever, as some have claimed, in the the tank for Donald Trump, he has officially climbed out as of this morning. On today's Morning Joe, reacting to the clip of Jake Tapper's interview, Scarborough called Trump's refusal to forthrightly reject the support of Klansman David Duke "disqualifying."

A bit later, Joe and Mika Brzezinski said that if Trump fails today to clean up the situation, Chris Christie "cannot stay with Donald Trump's campaign."



In what may be the worst series of attacks by the liberal media on Ted Cruz, Monday’s Nightly Show on Comedy Central featured host Larry Wilmore declaring that the “creepy” Cruz may be mentally disturbed with guest Aida Rodriguez firmly asserting that, if elected, Cruz’s agenda would be to “do everything the KKK does.” 



On the heels of news that he’s slipped to third place in the network late night comedy show ratings due to his alienation of right-leaning voters, Late Show host Stephen Colbert proved why it’s the case on Thursday as he accused Republicans of not being Christians for wanting to put a hold on the U.S. accepting Syrian refugees, contending it's comparable to the KKK as an example of Christians committing acts of terrorism.