In recent days, race-obsessed MSNBC contributor Jason Johnson has again been going off the rails with hyperbolic accusations of racism. Not only did he oddly accuse Toys R Us of promoting "white supremacy," but he even made a crack about Republicans and the KKK as he described the Alabama GOP Senate primary contest as "the Ku Klux versus the Klan."

 



In a pre-recorded interview aired on Friday's PBS NewsHour, PBS host Judy Woodruff asked guest Hillary Clinton if she believes President Donald Trump is "racist," and then did not challenge her when she claimed that Trump had "accepted the support of David Duke," and that he "has not condemned the neo-Nazis and the self-proclaimed white supremacists." Substitute host Hari Sreenivasan also teased that, in part two of the interview to be aired next week, Clinton had blamed "well-executed voter suppression of African-American voters" for her loss in Wisconsin.

 



Nunca hay que subestimar a Univisión cuando se trata de marcar nuevos momentos bajos del periodismo.



As former Breitbart News spokesman Kurt Bardella appeared as a guest on Sunday's Reliable Sources on CNN, he again demonstrated why he is the kind of Republican that both CNN and MSNBC like to have on as a recurring guest. Again trashing his former business associate, Bardella claimed that Breitbart News is "supporting the KKK" as he contended that many Donald Trump voters are not necessarily interested in reading the right-leaning website in spite of its history of supporting Trump.

 



MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews was back and firing on all cylinders Monday night, overseeing a show devoid of reason as it linked conservatives, Republicans, and anyone in the “right-wing” to the KKK, neo-Nazis, and white supremacists associated with Saturday’s Charlottesville terrorism. Matthews also showed ineptitude in not knowing that progressive heartthrob and President Woodrow Wilson loved the KKK film Birth of a Nation so much that he had it shown at the White House.



On Wednesday's Fox and Friends, as Fox News producer Greg Pergram reported in by phone in the aftermath of the attack on congressional Republicans in Alexandria, Virginia, he incorrectly recalled that it was the KKK that Scalise was accused of meeting with, when in reality the debunked accusation was that he spoke to a white nationalist group that was founded by David Duke. Additionally, Pergram failed to inform viewers that, even though Scalise issued an apology, the central claim that Scalise spoke to Duke's group was undermined both by a flyer from the event that did not list Scalise as a speaker, and by a man who helped organize the event who claimed that he invited Scalise to speak at a separate gathering that was not part of the white nationalist convention.



On Wednesday's All In, MSNBC contributor Jason Johnson still seemed to be clinging to the discredited story that Republican Rep. Steve Scalise spoke to a "white nationalist" group in Louisiana 15 years ago, as he suggested that the congressman has helped "exacerbate" tensions in politics. Near the end of the show, as host Chris Hayes suggested that liberals should ponder what their reaction would be "if the shoe were on the other foot" with regard to the Scalise shooting, Johnson suggested that politicians, including Scalise, do things to get votes that "exacerbate" tensions and "activate" people into violent behavior.



In a pre-recorded report on Thursday's New Day, CNN correspondent Randi Kaye repeated a discredited claim that Republican Rep. Steve Scalise 15 years ago spoke to a group founded by white supremacist and former KKK leader David Duke. As if the assertion that he spoke to the group were not in dispute, Kaye recalled: "Questions were raised about a speech he gave to a group led by former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke back in 2002."



As The Root's Jason Johnson appeared as a panel member on Wednesday's New Day on CNN, the race-obsessed political analyst was true to form as he took his latest opportunity to trash White House advisor Steve Bannon, this time calling him an "anti-Semite" and someone who "sympathizes with white terrorist organizations," as he received no pushback from CNN hosts Alisyn Camerota or Chris Cuomo over his incendiary charges.



Next Sunday’s New York Times Sunday Magazine will feature a long essay by left-wing historian Rick Perlstein: “I Thought I Understood the American Right. Trump Proved Me Wrong.” Approach with caution, warn two prominent conservative writers. National Review's Jonah Goldberg warns: “Perlstein’s essay offers a really good insight into how the Times has jettisoned so much credibility in the age of Trump.”



After the Big Three networks spent days forwarding accusations that Senator Jeff Sessions was a bigot, the time for his first confirmation hearing had finally arrived. The hearing was interrupted some nine times by roughly 25 people. This caught the attention of Senator Ted Cruz who made it his mission to set the record straight on his colleague’s history of combating racism and dared the liberal media to report the truth. ABC, CBS, and NBC all failed Cruz’s challenge Tuesday evening. 



On Tuesday's CNN Tonight, host Don Lemon cued up author Michael Higginbothum to claim that there was "racial amnesia" and a "Jim Crow mentality" around white voters being willing to vote for Donald Trump in spite of him using "a lot of racial rhetoric" in the campaign. Higginbothum -- author of Ghosts of Jim Crow -- went on to liken modern times to the era after Reconstruction when former Confederates celebrated the Ku Klux Klan and denied that slavery was primarily to blame for the American Civil War.