The Wall Street Journal's Kimberley Strassel appeared on Tucker Carlson's Fox News show Friday to discuss Thursday's Inspector General report on "Various Actions by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Department of Justice in Advance of the 2016 Election." She made the big-picture point most of the rest of the press is either ignoring or denying, namely that the IG has delivered "a searing indictment of the entire FBI and its culture."



Friday evening, Fox News's Martha MacCallum interviewed Washington Examiner chief political correspondent Byron York. In that interview's second half, the pair discussed new information which contradicts key contentions about "How the (Trump)-Russia inquiry began" made in a December New York Times story. That story claimed that the investigation began as a result of a May 2016 "heavy drinking" meeting between low-level Donald Trump campaign foreign policy adviser George Papadopoulos and Alexander Downer, Australia's top diplomat in Great Britain.



Axios is yet another leftist website which promised "vital, trustworthy news and analysis" with "no bias" and "no nonsense" but has subsequently descended into parody. Saturday, Mike Allen and Jim VandeHei, two of the site's founders, posted "The Public Case Against Trump," allegedly a list of "known knowns" about "a damning tale that would sink most leaders." It's a colossal example of fake news.



Someone is finally crying foul over an evidence-free fake-news effort pushed by the same people who have promoted the Steele dossier for over a year. This time, the targets are the NRA and President Trump's 2016 victorious presidential campaign. In a Thursday Wall Street Journal column and a Friday Fox News appearance, Kimberley Strassel decried how the press has turned "the most outlandish accusation into 'news'" based only on "the whispers of a couple of Democratic lawmakers" and "an anonymous reference to the FBI."



The liberal network shows were all busy Sunday morning pushing accusations and speculation about President Trump and his adviser Jared Kushner. Their discussion was driven by more anonymous sources telling The Washington Post that Kushner tried to set up a backchannel discussion between Trump and the Russians to talk about Syria. The hysteria was also present on NBC’s Meet the Press, but theirs was shattered by The Wall Street Journal’s Kimberley Strassel after she introduced facts to the discussion. 



A Wednesday Fox & Friends segment exposed the glaring double standard the establishment press has shown in its treatment of California Representative Devin Nunes's visit to the White House grounds, i.e., not the White Houe itself, to view intelligence information. Meanwhile, hundreds of visits to actual high-up White House officials and to the President himself during the Obama administration, including many by the Russian ambassador himself, as well as people who would appear to have had underhanded reasons for visiting, got little or no notice.



NBC’s Chuck Todd took a firm stand during Sunday’s Meet the Press as he pushed accusations that Trump’s campaign was colluding with the Russian government. “Connecting the dots between the Trump campaign and Russia,” he declared during his opening tease, “The growing evidence of the Trump-Russia connection threatens to consume the opening months of Donald Trump's presidency.” Through all of his hyperbole, Todd failed to mention that there is no evidence of such collusion. 



The front of Friday’s New York Times featured Michael Shear's interview with Chuck Jones, the now-famous president of Indiana United Steelworkers Local 1999, who came under withering attack by president-elect Donald Trump on Twitter on Wednesday night, after claiming that “Trump lied his ass off” about how many U.S. jobs Trump’s Carrier move would actually save. The headline: “Trump as Cyberbully in Chief? New Twitter Attack Draws Fire.” But it's hypocritical of the paper to condemn Trump on the front page as a powerful person bullying an innocent private citizen, while letting intimidation of private citizens by Obama go unremarked upon.



This week’s Philadelphia convention is playing host to a string of Democratic speakers promising to alter the First Amendment, to give government more control over who can engage in politics. “The Intimidation Game,” tells the story behind those calls.

 



It's a paradox. The liberal media champion themselves as the most open-minded people on planet Earth, with a devotion to the freedom of speech. How can intelligent people be so wrong? In reality, liberal elites have a nasty tendency to dismiss “conservative thought” as an oxymoron. They don’t read conservative books or magazines, and they wouldn’t lower themselves to watching conservatives on television. They have disdain for conservative talk radio. They're virtually illiterate on conservatives and conservatism.



Lois Lerner’s confession at that conference did contain one small truth. The IRS targeting scandal did indeed start in “Cincy”—as D.C. headquarters refers to that outpost. On a cold late February day in 2010, a Cincinnati screener named Jack Koester found himself focused on an application from a local Tea Party group.

 



It would almost not be worth noting, because it's so predictable. On Fox News Sunday, Juan Williams, with strategic support at opportune times from National Journal's Ron Fournier, characterized the support within the Republican Party for impeachment as coming from "Tea Party opposition ... (with) no diversity, it's a white, older group of people."

What makes it worthy of notice is the fact that Michael Needham, head of Heritage Action for America, called out Williams for his comments and held his own as Fournier attempted to be the supposed voice of reason while really bringing aid and comfort to Williams. Video and a transcript follow the jump: