In what was a poorly mangled attempt to be the liberal and unfunny Seth Meyers, CNN’s The Lead host Jake Tapper went on a rant Wednesday in which he pretended to throw fits at his staff for not showing clips and tweets of anti-Semitic Congresswoman Ilhan Omar (D-MN), but instead ones that painted the Trump administration and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) as not only hypocrites but anti-Semites.



Addressing the new “compromise” pertaining to border security, CNN Tonight host Don Lemon reiterated a tired old talking point attempting to smear the wall as racist; arguing that the purpose of the wall is “to blatantly attempt to stir up fear of people of color, of brown people.” He then invoked a phrase used by his colleague, Chris Cuomo, who argues that President Trump is “trying to scare people” by talking about “the brown menace.”  Lemon was just warming up; he accused President Trump and Republicans of racism many more times during his opening monologue on Monday’s edition of CNN Tonight.



Despite the fact that CNN has covered the latest anti-Semitism from Congresswoman Ilhan Omar (D-MN) throughout the day on Monday, numerous analysts and hosts have tried to assist Omar by muddying the waters, suggesting House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) is also anti-Semitic for a tweet last year criticizing the left-wing views of Michael Bloomberg, George Soros, and Tom Steyer.



Google’s CEO came to the House Judiciary Committee hearing on Dec.11, but was unwilling to play 21 questions. Five House representatives, from both political parties, asked CEO Sundar Pichai questions about Google’s involvement with China which he refused to answer again and again.

 



Google had a loud defender in the House Judiciary Committee — interestingly the company is also is his top donor. During the House Judiciary Committee hearing where Google CEO Sundar Pichai was testifying, Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY) opened fire against the House Majority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).

 



CBS This Morning co-hosts scored an exclusive interview with the newly chosen House Minority Leader, Kevin McCarthy. But the network journalists chose to spend the entire interview demanding he answer for a lack of diversity within the Republican Party. 



On Tuesday’s Hardball, MSNBC host Chris Matthews irresponsibly dabbled in fake/false news by claiming that Republicans and those in GOP leadership haven’t spoken out against President Trump’s handling of the Charlottesville violence, including his Tuesday afternoon press conference. Matthews was squabbling with frequent Hardball guest and GOP strategist John Brabender when he went down that path (despite Brabender largely agreeing with Matthews).



Thursday, on Morning Joe, discussions concerning Jeff Sessions and his contact with a Russian ambassador consumed most of the program. During the 7:00 a.m. Eastern hour, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy was grilled to give his opinion of the Sessions situation. McCarthy was asked several times even though he made clear he was just learning of the story himself saying, “I'm just now reading about this myself.” About twenty minutes later, host Mika Brzezinski introduced a misleading clip of this interview.



Michael Kinsley’s second-best-known contribution to political discourse, trailing only the “Kinsley gaffe,” is his observation that “the scandal isn't the illegal behavior -- the scandal is what's legal.” In a Thursday post, Steve Benen, a producer for MSNBC’s The Rachel Maddow Show and the primary writer for the TRMS blog, sought to apply Kinsley’s wisdom to the congressional inquiry into the September 2012 Benghazi attack.

“The Benghazi Committee isn’t investigating a scandal. The Benghazi Committee is the scandal,” declared Benen (italics in original).There’s been some debate in recent weeks about whether congressional Democrats should continue to participate in such an obvious farce. It’s a worthwhile question that deserves an answer.”



Esquire’s Charles Pierce seemingly would like a time machine to take him back a quarter-century so he could advise the Tom Foley/George Mitchell-era Democratic party. Failing that, Pierce wishes today’s Dems would at last act on his idea to persuade the American people that the Republican party is “thoroughly, deeply, banana-sandwich loony,” thereby “beat[ing] the crazy out of [the GOP] so the country can get moving again.”

“Republican extremism should have been the most fundamental campaign issue for every Democratic candidate for every elected office since about 1991,” argued Pierce in a Friday post. “The mockery and ridicule should have been loud and relentless. It was the only way to break both the grip of the prion disease, and break through the solid bubble of disinformation, anti-facts, and utter bullshit that has sustained the Republican base over the past 25 years.”



The surprise withdrawal of Rep. Kevin McCarthy from the race for Speaker gave the New York Times an excuse to issue a series of front-page stories larded up with hostile "hard-line" and "hard-right" labels mocking the apparent chaos surrounding congressional Republicans, being held "hostage" by the party's conservative wing.



On Friday's PBS Newshour, host Judy Woodruff joined liberal columnist Mark Shields in declaring that the House GOP's conservative wing is holding the Congress "hostage," with allegedly right-leaning regular and New York Times columnist David Brooks then complaining that Tea Partiers are good at "destruction," but not "construction." Brooks further griped that, "to get elected, especially as a Republican," there is an incentive for "radical rhetoric," referring to the situation as a "mental problem."