In mid-May, the Associated Press's Ken Thomas devoted over 800 words to the Center for American Progress's "Ideas Conference." Given that level of recognition, one might think that the AP and Thomas might have covered a blatantly false tweet the think tank published Monday about potential Donald Trump Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett by now. Nope.



On Saturday afternoon, Ken Thomas and Jon Gambrell at the Associated Press demonstrated the wire service's chronic resistance to recognizing genuinely good news during the Trump era. The pair pretended in their story about Donald Trump's Saturday conversation with Saudi King Salman that the President could only "claim" that Saudi Arabia has agreed to significantly boost its oil production in response to a tightening in worldwide supplies — even though as soon as Trump tweeted about it, the Saudi news agency confirmed its substance.



Friday’s White House press briefing devolved into a tense sparring session as liberal journalists circled the wagons around Democratic Congresswoman Frederica Wilson (Fla.) against criticism from Chief of Staff John Kelly while Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders slammed the media’s obsessive coverage of the Gold Star family story. The question from AP correspondent Ken Thomas first raised the temperature, touting Sun-Sentinel video of Wilson’s 2015 remarks at the dedication of a new FBI building that Kelly criticized as being no more than political grandstanding.



Thursday afternoon, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell sharply criticized the establishment press for ignoring damning new information about how Russia, according to a blockbuster report at The Hill, gained "control of more than 20 percent of America’s uranium supply."  2-1/2 days later, the Associated Press has finally reacted — by treating the report as a mere "reprise" of old news.



If there's ever a "most pathetic correction ever" contest, the one posted by the Associated Press late Friday afternoon, conveniently ahead of what for many Americans will be a very long holiday weekend, has to be a serious contender. The wire service won't even acknowledge that it's a correction at its APnews.com site, instead calling it a "clarification." No one should be fooled. The AP's folly appears to have been triggered by an appropriately labeled correction posted at the New York Times Thursday evening which, as Kristine Marsh at NewsBusters noted Friday morning, "admitted (that) one of the media’s major talking points about the (government's) Russia investigation wasn’t actually true."



In a late Wednesday afternoon NewsBusters post, I commented on the extraordinary hostility reporters at the Associated Press exhibited towards Donald Trump and his administration during their first two full business days in power. In that post, I wondered if they might be carrying a childish grudge over not being able to ask the first question at Press Secretary Sean Spicer's briefings, as they virtually always have since last decade. An unbylined late Tuesday AP report spotted by John Hinderaker at Powerline confirmed my suspicion. They're mad as hornets, and clearly can't handle it.



Though they haven't yet completed covering things up, Hillary Clinton's journalistic defense team at the Associated Press has swung into gear at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

The headline at the wire service's 10:00 p.m. Monday evening story by reporters Julie Pace and Ken Thomas — "AFTER DISPUTES, DEM STARS TURN THEIR CONVENTION POSITIVE" — falsely told readers that the contentiousness was over. Far from it. The pair's cleanup isn't complete yet (I expect we'll see that by early Tuesday morning), because their early paragraphs still betray the widely-reported disarray which occurred throughout the day. Pace and Thomas also need to work on their hearing, because they're claiming that a chant which became popular at the Republican convention last week relating to Hillary Clinton — "Lock her up!" — hasn't been heard in Philadelphia. They're wrong.



As of early this morning, Matt Drudge was carrying a link to a story headlining how President Obama is "under fire for saying ISIS 'contained' just hours before Paris attack."

Well, Obama is under some fire, but Drudge's link is to coverage at the UK Daily Mail. That's unfortunately unsurprising, because there is little to no mention of Obama's naive, foolish and callous statement in the U.S. establishment press. So Obama may be "under fire" from people who are paying attention, but low-information news consumers (and voters) who didn't happen to see the original Thursday interview will likely remain unaware of it. In one such example of convenient oversight, the Associated Press published a Thursday evening story on that interview, and decided that its only newsworthy element was Obama's immigration-related criticism of GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump.



Just as a reality check, I asked a friend today what his reaction would be if I said with a sincere-sounding voice that he makes me want to strangle him. He said, "Almost sounds like a threat." I said, "No, it was supposed to be a joke." He said, "No it's not."

I also asked another person what her reaction would be if I earnestly called her "demented." She said, "You'd be insulting me." I asked, "What if I said I was just joking?" Response: "I'd say, 'The heck you were.'" In the past ten days, members of the press have decided that threatening language and an insult, both directed at GOP presidential candidate Carly Fiorina, were only "jokes." There is virtually no chance that these same people would give the same treatment to threats and insults directed at Democrats and leftists.



It would appear that Hillary Clinton's act is wearing thin even among the people at that liberal bastion known as NPR.

Tuesday afternoon, the headline at an NPR story about Mrs. Clinton's sudden decision to publicly announce her opposition to the Keystone XL Pipeline project indicated that her announcement was deliberately timed to coincide with Pope Francis's visit to the United States (HT Stephen Kruiser at PJ Media):



Though it's not exactly a secret that supporting John Kasich is hardly an indicator of genuine conservatism, Buckeye State liberals frequently whine that the Columbus Dispatch is a right-wing rag which gets behind Ohio's Republican Governor at every turn.

If the Dispatch is so instinctively conservative, how does one explain reporter Darrel Rowland's apparent original exercise in cheerleading as he covered Hillary Clinton's Thursday appearance at the Columbus Athenaeum, a historic building whose meeting hall has a capacity of 1,250? Rowland, unlike his colleagues in the national establishment press, failed to note the existence of quite an expanse of empty space at the event.



Democrats' current and potential candidates for their party's 2016 presidential nomination continue to complain about various aspects of the economy. They continue to make no connection between their complaints and the fact that Democrat Barack Obama has been in the White House for over six years. Obama has for the most part operated either under the conditions created by the 2009-2010 Congress or, when resisted, by unilaterally ruling through executive orders and arbitrary regulatory actions.

Establishment press outlets, likely recognizing the candidates' hypocrisy, mostly fail to carry their complaints — and when they do, they make no attempt to note that the candidates are citing areas the Obama administration has either failed to address, or has attempted to address counterproductively. This pattern of behavior became so obvious yesterday as a result of Vice President Joe Biden's appearance in Pittsburgh that National Review and IJ Review contributor Stephen Miller tweeted the following: