The Democratic National Committee has accused the MSNBC cable channel of having "a pretty big double standard" regarding its “confusing policy” of forbidding some anchors from attending political fundraising events while others are allowed to speak at similar programs, according to a letter written to Phil Griffin, president of the liberal television network.

Mo Elleithee, the DNC's communications director, indicated that channel executives prevented Ed Schultz -- host of the weekday afternoon program The Ed Show – from appearing at a Democratic Unity Dinner in Broward County, Fla., on March 15, while Joe Scarborough, a co-host of the weekday Morning Joe program, is slated to give the keynote address at next month's Cheshire County Republican Lincoln Day Dinner in New Hampshire.



In case you’re one of those conservatives that doesn’t want liberal social crusades constantly mixed in your sports journalism, see D.C. sports radio host Steve Czaban. He has a blog post titled “ESPN Will Force You To Care! Resistance Is Futile.”

ESPN ombudsman Robert Lipsyte  – a former New York Times columnist whose more recent home is Mother Jones – is lecturing the less-than-progressives, as he summarizes the viewpoint: “Enough already about Michael Sam, Jason Collins, Richie Incognito, Jonathan Martin, concussions and the N-word. I turn on ESPN to get away from the stress of everyday life, to relax with my friends, to share some family time with the kids. Why do you keep shoving that stuff in my face?” Answer: More face-shoving!



The notion that MSNBC is now the most controversial gaffe-a-minute cable news network has been ratified by the Associated Press. AP media reporter David Bauder wrote a story headlined “Loose lips give ammunition to MSNBC foes.”

“Since MSNBC is in the political ring, its opponents are always on the lookout for things to attack,” Bauder wrote. “Lately, NBC's left-leaning cable news sister has offered plenty of ammunition.”



On Thursday, MSNBC President Phil Griffin apologized for a Twitter post suggesting conservatives (“the rightwing”) are racists who would “hate” a cute new Cheerios ad because it featured a biracial family: “The tweet last night was outrageous and unacceptable. We immediately acknowledged that it was offensive and wrong, apologized, and deleted it. We have dismissed the person responsible for the tweet.”

Griffin’s statement was a good first step, but if an apology is owed for this tweet, then MSNBC owes conservatives many, many more. The Media Research Center has compiled a long list of instances in which the network’s anchors have committed character assassination disguised as journalism, unjustly smearing conservatives, Republicans and the Tea Party as racists. Here are just some of the many outrageous examples we have documented:



On the cover of the latest Esquire magazine is this quote from ESPN  host Keith Olbermann: "I’ve never fought the word genius when people have said that about me." In a "What I've Learned" interview, Olbermann added, "But what it is is instinct and a set of skills that are working so fast you don’t know they’re working."

Keith also declared "I have a leafy brain, according to the theory of the leafy brain. I associate things that many people never put together." This sounds like someone's brain on leaves...and a lighter.



Just when it seemed that the biggest controversies in football consisted of the Washington Redskins being criticized for having a “racial” team name and the Miami Dolphins dealing with accusations of bullying by suspended guard Richie Incognito, along comes ESPN analyst Kevin Blackistone, who charged on Wednesday that the “Star-Spangled Banner” is nothing short of a “war anthem” that should not be played before any sports event.

During a segment of the cable television network's Around the Horn weekday program, the frequent guest also stated that the national anthem was first played “in the World Series back in 1917” and asserted “it's time for people to back away” from the beloved song.



He's been fired by virtually every television network he's worked for, but Keith Olbermann recently told GQ, "I'll always deliver what an employer wants."

Try not damage your computer and/or keyboard as you read Olbermann talking about the wonders of himself:



During Monday's debut of Keith Olbermann's new weeknight program on the ESPN2 sports channel -- unsurprisingly called Olbermann -- it took him only 48 seconds to stray from sports reporting into his former role as political commentator while slamming a reporter with the New York Daily News for “making up” a story on whether New York Jets coach Rex Ryan would be fired.

“Reporting is dead; long live making something out of nothing,” the leftist former host of programs on MSNBC and the Current TV channel declared. A few minutes earlier, Olbermann stated that New Jersey governor Chris Christie had “signed in” on the controversy, and even though the host had promised “the show wouldn't be about politics,” he broke his word because “I agree with the governor.”



For years, Keith Olbermann mercilessly attacked George W. Bush on his MSNBC program Countdown.

Despite this, the producers of Olbermann's upcoming program on ESPN2 told the Hollywood Reporter Wednesday that they've reached out to Bush to appear on the show:



Keith Olbermann on Friday was booed for making fun of Al Gore.

Potentially even funnier, this happened moments after CBS’s Craig Ferguson mocked Olbermann for owning “a little dog that fits in your purse as you go around to your outspoken liberal meetings” (video follows with transcribed highlights and commentary):



The New York Times claimed last week that Keith Olbermann was given a new late night show on ESPN2 with the caveat that he not discuss politics.

Speaking to reporters at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour Wednesday, Olbermann denied this saying, "There's no such clause that said I could not talk about politics, there is no such clause referring to content about anything that we might do on the show."



It appears people really don't learn from their mistakes.

Despite Keith Olbermann departing ESPN in 1997 under a cloud of controversy, the sports channel is reportedly giving him his own late night program with the caveat that he doesn't discuss politics.