The New York Times is still trying to refurbish the thuggish reputation of the Communist regime of East Germany, once part of the Eastern Bloc, Soviet-aligned countries of Eastern Europe. The latest sad example came from reporter Thomas Rogers in Berlin, dedicated to the now-demolished Palast der Republik. The online headline: “Symbol of a Brutal Regime? Or a Fun Place to Party?” Rogers was gentle with the monstrous East German regime: "...it still arouses nostalgia among some former citizens who fondly remember its gender egalitarianism and social safety net or admire its utopian aspirations."



New York Times Berlin bureau chief Katrin Bennhold, a native of Germany, doesn’t seem in tune with her home country, calling the idea of putting a speed limit on the autobahn a “no-brainer,” one tragically scuttled by the “far right,” and maybe, somehow, Hitler. “Speed Limit? Germans Voting With Lead Feet,” on the front page of Monday’s New York Times. Adolf Hitler makes a cameo.



If it seems like the New York Times is constantly hammering U.S. President Donald Trump, that’s because it is. However, the “Paper of Record” was also so eager to attack a politician with a similar nickname as “Germany’s Trump” that they failed to verify several false quotes the item attributed to him. The original story debuted as a “Saturday feature article” that focused on Markus Söder, the premier of Bavaria and a man who got his nickname because of “his tough views on immigration, his ‘shrewd’ communication skills and his distaste for political correctness.”



Ali Bashar, a 20 year-old Iraqi who sought and was rejected for asylum in Germany, has been arrested after fleeing to Kurdistan, and has now reportedly admitted to raping and killing 14 year-old Susanna Feldman in Wiesbaden in May. A New York Times report posted before that reported admission, as well as Associated Press items appearing both before and after it, betray a clear reluctance to acknowledge key facts in the case, and an overriding concern that opponents of Germany's permissive migration policy might gain political traction from this horrific crime.



The New York Times starkly revealed its disparate, biased, and hopelessly confused treatment of fascist and socialist ideologies on Saturday, with Trump indirectly lumped in with European fascist parties. Reporter Jason Horowitz was featured on Saturday’s front page, “In Italian Campaign, Gravity of Far Right Exerts Its Strongest Pull.” Horowitz threw out plenty of “far-right” and “hard right” labels to describe some of the unsavory populist parties emerging in Europe. But on the same front page, White House correspondent Peter Baker also used “hard right” to describe the Trump administration’s policy moves. Meanwhile, another reporter celebrated a popular German socialist and knocked "trickle-down economics."



New York Times reporter Katrin Bennhold’s front-page story commemorating the fall of the Berlin Wall, “Still Chipping Away at a Wall Demolished a Generation Ago,” contained an incredibly ignorant paragraph about the freedoms of East German women: "Eastern women, who were part of the work force and with free child care, were more emancipated than their western sisters...." But it's far from the worst Times story celebrating the former East Germany.



In an attempt to build up its already bulging "We'll never really know why they did it" file relating to Islamist radicals who have taken innocent lives, three reporters at The New York Times composed a 1,900-word report Saturday evening (for Sunday's print edition) about Manchester bomber Salman Abedi's family background. The reporters provided very little hard information about Abedi's motivations, despite the fact that readers who saw the paper's tweet which promoted the article were led to expect it: "What led Salman Abedi to bomb the Manchester arena?" But they did push hard the news that Abedi called his mom before he carried the attack.



At 4:45 p.m. Wednesday afternoon, the New York Times, teasing an item entitled "‘Dangerous Moment’ for Europe, as Fear and Resentment Grow," tweeted that "The Paris terror attack seems certain to accelerate the growth of anti-Islamic sentiment in Europe."

Consistent with a long-established nasty habit, the opening sentence of the report by Steven Erlanger and Katrin Bennhold has since been revised without notice, and is tagged as appearing on Thursday's front page. The headline is the same, but the first sentence now reads: "The sophisticated, military-style strike Wednesday on a French newspaper known for satirizing Islam staggered a continent already seething with anti-immigrant sentiments in some quarters, feeding far-right nationalist parties like France’s National Front." Yeah, those are Europe's biggest problems, not Islamic terrorism.



New York Times international reporter Katrin Bennhold followed up her previous whitewashed story on Islamic extremism in schools in England with an update headlined "Report Cites ‘Aggressive’ Islamic Push in British City's Schools," which thankfully lacked the tone of mockery that marred her first report.

In June, Bennhold tried to make the UK government investigation sound ludicrous and prejudiced, summing up the situation with the regretful: "But stereotypes die hard." But a new British government investigation shows the situation in Birmingham, England even more disturbing than previously thought, as Bennhold confirmed in Wednesday's Times, albeit after some throat-clearing and hesitation.



The "Memo from Birmingham" in Monday's New York Times, "Reading, Writing and Allegations," by reporter Katrin Bennhold, partially whitewashed the problem of Islamic separatism and possible tolerance for extremism at a high school in Birmingham, England.

Bennhold, playing lightly over allegations against Park View School, strove to make a recent UK government investigation sound ludicrous and prejudiced.