New York Times reporters Katie Rogers and Maggie Haberman were offended that President Trump doesn’t like to watch CNN, using a leaked anecdote from Air Force One for a full-page story Wednesday: “A Bit of a Stir’ Aboard Air Force One: A TV Tuned to CNN.” The headline writers went overboard. The text box: “A president who rages against reality wants to keep the remote control for himself.” The online headline: “Spotting CNN on a TV Aboard Air Force One, Trump Rages Against Reality.” So in Timesland, “reality” equals CNN?



Former prosecutor and NYC mayor Rudy Giuliani, the newest member of President Trump’s legal team as he battles special counsel Robert Mueller on several fronts, caused a stir with some blunt talk involving payouts to porn actress Stormy Daniels. The New York Times, a long-time enemy of Giuliani, ran two stories in the lead slot Friday under the headline: “On Attack for Trump, Giuliani May Aggravate Legal and Political Peril.” But it was reporter Katie Rogers who brought the paper’s trademark mean-spirited touch, in “Giuliani’s Bark May Come Back to Bite Trump.” The text box: “A bombastic former mayor undermines his client, the president.”



Employing unprofessional speculation, reporters Katie Rogers and Joe Coscarelli hinted in the New York Times that famously flaky rapper Kanye West’s Twitter admiration, if not full support, for President Trump was related to incipient mental illness: "In a string of tweets that seemed to outrage and concern his fans, Mr. West tried to defend his admiration for the president from “the mob” of people who “can’t make me not love him.....But the tweets caused bedlam among Mr. West’s fans. They had begun debating his mental stability earlier Wednesday...."



New York Times reporter Katie Rogers covered the impromptu discussion at the White House on video games and violence, and casually worked in several strong “censorship” smears against those concerned about the issue: "Melissa Henson, the director of programs for the Parents Television Council, a censorship advocacy group...."



In Wednesday's New York Times, three reporters reflected on "how Washington insiders are viewing pop culture" in 2017. The most interesting take was that the Saturday Night Live "Alec Baldwin bits" on Trump this year haven't "drawn a ton of blood" in Washington. Their mockery of female Trump aides also failed to score with insiders, they declared.



In covering the shocking firing of NBC Today host Matt Lauer over sexual harassment allegations, the New York Times chose to focus on the shocking results of campaign 2016 and the loss of their favored candidate Hillary Clinton. After two decades of Lauer’s liberal bias (and hypocritical criticism of sexual harassment by Donald Trump and Bill O’Reilly), the Times could only focus on how Lauer supposedly treated Hillary Clinton in unfair, biased, and sexist fashion during a September 2016 presidential forum featuring her and Donald Trump by actually conducting a tough journalistic interview with the candidate for a change.



New York Times reporter Katie Rogers is a kind of pop-social reporter in D.C. in the Trump era, and has little love for the people she covers. Rogers made the front page of Saturday’s edition with some snarky that seems a few months past its sell-by date: “Trump Hotel by Night: Lobbyists, $60 Steaks.” One would think sophisticated big-city Times editors would know $60 isn’t really all that much to pay for a steak in D.C. But it’s a small price to pay for a dig at Trump, apparently. Rogers was far kinder to Chelsea Clinton in April, in a celebration of the privileged president’s daughter and her...Twitter feed.



New York Times Katie Rogers tried to have it both ways in her story on Chelsea Clinton’s Twitter feed, claiming the Clinton daughters’ tweets were “innocent,” and forwarded advice from a Clinton friend to Chelsea’s “naysayers”: “Just unfollow.” Yet Rogers still reprinted some of Clinton’s highly politicized tweets, as if to keep her in the partisan mix anyway. Rogers’ front page Styles section report, “Calm Before the Tweet Storm – Chelsea Clinton shows a more confrontational side online,” was news-free publicity for Clinton, while avoiding controversy -- and actual news value -- like the plague



New York Times reporter Katie Rogers celebrated anti-Trump protests as “the new brunch” in the big-government stronghold of D.C.: “A City Where Dissent Becomes a Lifestyle.” Rogers’ story occupied two-thirds of the page, with photos down the middle from various D.C. protests and a long and fawning explainer of a photo caption, full of liberal blandishment.



The front of the New York Times Arts section featured an exhaustive report on the controversy over the world-famous Rockettes performing at Donald Trump’s inauguration: “Still Kicking, but No Longer Silent.” The text box was harsh to Trump for ruining an American tradition: “A Trump Inauguration Casualty: The Silent, Smiling Rockettes."



Yesterday's "Occupy Congress" push by the Occupy D.C. protesters resulted in four arrests at the U.S. Capitol and a lockdown at the White House after someone lobbed "an object similar to a smoke bomb" over the White House fence.

If such disturbing incidents accompanied a Tea Party protest, the harsh reaction by the Washington Post would be predictable and, indeed, to an extent justifiable. But Washington Post reporters Annie Gowen and Katie Rogers painted the protests in a generally positive light in Metro front page article, "Occupiers confront seats of power."* Indeed, Gowen and Rogers buried deep in their article the fact that one of the four protesters arrested was charged with assaulting a police officer.