On Thursday, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell and more than 20 conservative leaders released a statement rejecting Facebook’s “insulting” response to specific examples of bias. They declared, “No conservative leader or organization should accept this as a legitimate response to the undeniable issues we have raised.” The Media Research Center (MRC) also leads a group called the Free Speech Alliance of almost 60 organizations dedicated to combating the censorship of conservatives online. 



On Tuesday, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell and other conservative leaders released a letter calling on Google to explain reports and allegations that the search engine is attempting to block conservative sites and exclude voices that don’t fit the liberal narrative. (A similar letter has also been sent to members of Congress, asking them to investigate.) The letter to Google can be found, in its entirety, below: 



Liberal bias in journalism is not just bad for the profession as an abstract concept, it's bad for the bottom line of media companies and their shareholders. That was the argument of one Justin Danhof of the conservative National Center for Public Policy Research (NCPPR) when he attended a Disney shareholders meeting and confronted the entertainment company's CEO Bob Iger about liberal bias at the news division of ABC. "Liberal bias pervades Disney's media outlets" and "it's time to stop denying this bias and start doing something about it," Danhof argued, having cited former ESPN analyst Rob Parker's "cornball brother" crack about black quarterback and alleged Republican Robert Griffin III and ABC News's Brian Ross's infamous episode in which he hinted that Auroroa, Colorado theater shooter James Holmes might be a Tea Party member.

Danhof argued that Disney executives need to take seriously NCPPR's concerns and the concerns of other conservatives who happen to own Disney stock. Danhof appealed not so much to Iger's sense of journalistic integrity but rather the bottom line: Putting out a fairer, more balanced news product may help ABC attract more conservative viewers, and with them, higher ratings and more customers buying products from ABC News program sponsors, leading of course to higher profit margins for Disney. [h/t Huffington Post; Danhof's statement embedded below the page break]



An attorney for the National Center for Public Policy Research, speaking yesterday at Comcast's annual shareholder meeting, demanded an on-air correction and apology for defamatory claims by MSNBC's Rachel Maddow.

National Center general counsel Justin Danhof directed his statement to Brian Roberts, CEO of Comcast, majority owner of NBCUniversal, which in turn owns MSNBC. In his remarks, Danhof hinted at legal action if Comcast fails to comply. (video after page break)