Aging liberal fans of “Camelot” won’t be happy with the portrayal of John F. Kennedy in the new season of Netflix’s The Crown. Various reviews reveal that the liberal icon will be portrayed as a “functional addict,” “a jealous jerk” and a “scheming conniver.” Yet, the Washington Post on Friday glossed over this negative portrayal, minimizing it. 



In school, I liked math the least and history the most. Both can be useful in the coming debate over President Trump's proposed tax reforms. The one thing I learned in math class is that if the formula is wrong, the answer will be wrong. In history class, I learned we are not the first people to occupy the planet and that the experiences of those who came before us can be helpful when considering contemporary issues.



In a bizarre story for NBC’s Today on Friday, correspondent Peter Alexander preemptively attacked President Trump for possibly blocking the release of classified government files related to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, even though the reporter acknowledged that  “no decision’s been made” by the administration regarding the obscure bureaucratic matter.
 



Friday’s New York Times featured an obscure bit of history of interest to liberal Kennedy devotees, including perhaps Times reporter Matthew Haag, who used the hook to hang up some seriously starry-eyed hagiography in his news story, “Sounds of a Young Kennedy In a Harvard Classroom."



In a two-minute video posted at PJ Media on Sunday, MSNBC's Chris Matthews stated that he wants Donald Trump to succeed, and that he "used to think" that presidential preference polls were honest, but "they were wrong." This is pretty odd coming a guy who, as seen in several recent NewsBusters posts, has frequently compared the Trump family to the Romanovs, and who has seemed to encourage people at the IRS to leak Trump's prior-year tax returns, saying that doing so would be "a good leak."



On Sunday night, the thrill inside of MSNBC’s Chris Matthews was alive and well for Barack Obama as he anchored a two-hour special swooning over the “American eloquence” of the President as he received the Profile in Courage Award from the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library.



In a piece of fawning propaganda for Wednesday’s NBC Today, special correspondent and former NBC Nightly News anchor Tom Brokaw made it clear that the network would be covering the liberal legend rather that the hard reality of John F. Kennedy’s legacy to mark the 100th anniversary of the late President’s birth.



MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews is notorious for saying stupid things, but salty language is not usually associated with him. While trashing President Trump and his criticism of President Obama, Matthews whined to his panelists that all Trump does is “bitch, bitch.”



Over at Reason, University of Alabama professor of history David T. Beito has written a fascinating look at “Roosevelt’s War Against the Press.” The telling subtitle? “FDR Had His Own Breitbart, and Radio Was His Twitter.” Well, yes. Exactly. I have been writing for sometime that not only is the FDR and radio comparison to Trump and Twitter eerily analogous, but that two other presidents made superb use of the new technology of their day: Abraham Lincoln and the telegraph and John F. Kennedy and the live televised presidential press conference.



WASHINGTON — The average American is understandably perplexed as to why Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and, of course, the runner up in last year's Democrat primaries, Sen. Bernie Saunders, are so lathered up over the Republicans' recent overtures to the Russians. They are calling for the impeachment of Attorney General Jeff Sessions.



President Donald Trump's inaugural address may not have risen to the rhetorical level of John F. Kennedy ("The torch has been passed to a new generation of Americans" and "Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country"), or Ronald Reagan's critique of government ("Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem"), or even Barack Obama's in 2009 ("On this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord"), but the speech set out large goals, many details of which are yet to be revealed.

 



Is it hasta la vista, baby, for the venerable White House daily briefing for the media? Way back there in 1955 James Hagerty, the press secretary for President Dwight Eisenhower, came to the conclusion that admitting television cameras to presidential press conferences  Ike held in the Indian Treaty Room of the next-door to the White House Old Executive Office Building (now named for Eisenhower) was the future.