Friday brought us another White House press briefing featuring Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany batting behind President Trump and Dr. Deborah Birx and, predictably, McEnany continued to impress (except the ardent anti-Trump liberal media). On new CDC guidelines allowing houses of worship to safely reopen and then the Michael Flynn case, McEnany rattled their cages. In the case of the former, she raised eyebrows when she informed the journalists assembled that they’re hoping “desperately” that “these churches and houses of worship stay closed.”



White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany ended Wednesday's press briefing with a bruising takedown of the liberal media after Reuters White House correspondent Jeff Mason wondered if she’d retract comments about the coronavirus from a February 25 Fox Business appearance. Instead of offer a mea culpa that wouldn’t assuage the liberal media’s disdain for her or anyone else in the administration, McEnany lowered the boom with a series of news headlines from earlier in the year before the pandemic truly went global and became a grim situation.



Paul Bedard of the Washington Examiner pointed out the DNC war room's latest press release on Saturday's White House press briefing listed 23 tweets from "prominent reporters from the New York Times, CNN, MSNBC, NPR, Al-Jazeera, Washington Post, Huffington Post, and others."



It’s really, really hard for many in the media to put politics aside, even when asking the president questions about the coronavirus. That was obvious during today’s press conference where President Trump fielded condescending questions from reporters questioning his credibility, and if his supporters actually follow medical advice.



One thing historians will say about President Obama was that he had an affinity for drone warfare for the purposes of taking out terrorists. In that respect President Trump was doing the same thing when he ordered that Qasem Soleimani be taken out, but that's not how MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell saw things on her Tuesday show.

 


Fox News afternoon anchor Shepard Smith told Time magazine a few weeks ago “I think we have to make the wall between news and opinion as high and as thick and as impenetrable as possible. And I try to do that.” Then he goes on television and makes a mockery of his own pledge not to spew opinions. On Wednesday, the Internet lit up when Smith accused his own network of a conspiracy to put a group of voices on television counseling President Trump to avoid an interview with special counsel Robert Mueller.  



Roughly two hours after White House press secretary Sean Spicer announced his resignation, Reuters disturbingly set up shop outside Spicer’s house and provided a livestream for viewers to follow along with. It doesn’t take a whole lot of decency to conclude that this is a disgusting and tasteless display by an organization who’s White House correspondent (Jeff Mason) is the president of the White House Correspondents Association (WHCA).



During a White House press conference in the 12 p.m. ET hour on Friday, President Obama was treated to a series of softball questions from reporters, who repeatedly teed him up to bash Republicans and promote his liberal agenda. Reuters correspondent Jeff Mason got the first question: “Mr. President, what's your reaction to Donald Trump becoming the presumptive nominee of the Republican Party this week? And given the delegate math, do you think it’s time for Bernie Sanders to step aside on the Democratic race?”



Will Deener, who has been a business reporter since at least before the turn of the century, considers his most unforgettable experience on the job to be "Covering the crash of the Internet stocks and Enron in 2000-2002."

Sunday evening, the Dallas Morning News columnist moaned about how big U.S. companies engaged in real businesses are avoiding paying billions in taxes because "the nation’s largest companies stockpile billions of dollars in profits overseas." In the process, he assumed that companies would pay the highest federal income tax rate of 35 percent on all overseas profits repatratriated. That's simply wrong, and it's astonishing that someone with his experience doesn't know any better. That level of ignorance largely explains why President Barack Obama, earlier this year, was able to package what was effectively a reversal of decades of tax policy as a "one-time tax" on such earnings — whether or not they were repatriated.



At President Barack Obama's press conference in The Hague, Netherlands today, as part of a much longer question, ABC's Jonathan Karl asked Obama whether "Mitt Romney had a point when he said that Russia is America’s biggest geopolitical foe? If not Russia, who?"

It's important to note that Obama's response to that portion of Karl's question pertained to and was directed at Romney. A video containing Karl's question and Obama's answer ("With respect to Mr. Romney’s assertion that Russia’s our number- one geopolitical foe, the truth of the matter is that, you know, America’s got a whole lot of challenges. Russia is a regional power that is threatening some of its immediate neighbors -- not out of strength, but out of weakness") shows that the President's tone at that point was generally calm with a bit of a defiant edge which seemed directed at Romney and Karl (perhaps not in that order). That didn't stop the establishment press from claiming that Obama's statement was really an insult directed at Russia (it wasn't) and that the President supposedly directed his "derisive" statement towards Russian President Vladimir Putin (he didn't).



Journalists like to tell us about their professionalism and the many layers of editors that ensure their accuracy. However, somewhere in those layers of editors, have reporters lost the ability to perform basic research? In the case of Reuters reporter Jeff Mason, it would seem to be so. Mason wrote an article on California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger's Monday speech on global warming, in which he wrote,
President George W. Bush pulled the United States out of the Kyoto accord, saying it unfairly burdened rich countries while exempting developing countries like China and India.