During Sunday’s Fox News Sunday, host Chris Wallace contrasted front-page headlines from The Washington Post the day after Republican Congressman Steve Scalise was shot at an Alexandria, VA baseball field by a Bernie Sanders supporter with The Post's headline following the capture of mail bomb mastermind and Trump supporter Cesar Sayoc. Not surprisingly, The Post made sure to emphasize that Sayoc's political views were mentioned in the headline while the assailant's political leanings were not mentioned in the Scalise shooting headline.  



On Thursday morning, CNN and MSNBC pounced on their latest opportunity to ignore police violence-related stories that do not fit the narrative that cops mostly target black suspects for shootings and excessive force. In fact, there were two significant stories highlighted by ABC, CBS, and NBC morning shows which stand out as being ignored by the two liberal cable news networks.



Whether America is still racist probably depends on how the term “racism” is being defined in the discussion. Are we talking about official government policies? Are we discussing genetic determinism and innate inferiority? Are we referring more broadly to negative opinions about people from different racial or ethnic backgrounds? Or are we simply talking about people who disagree with us on matters involving race.



On the Wednesday edition of the Fox News Channel’s Special Report, conservative talk radio host Laura Ingraham and her fellow panelists thoroughly excoriated President Barack Obama for a hypocritical and “infantile” attack on the cable network’s reach leading to Donald Trump’s election that’s grown to become a tiring “common thread” for the duration of presidency.



On the most recent edition of Fox News SundayWall Street Journal columnist Jason Riley blasted President Obama, Attorney General Eric Holder, and activist/MSNBC host Al Sharpton for having “a vested interest in pushing a false narrative, which is that racism is an all-purpose explanation of what drives what's wrong in black America.”

When asked by host Chris Wallace to explain why there remains a debate in the U.S. over race and the criminal justice system, Riley pointed out that the “the left has no interest in being post-racial” despite pretending to be in favor of it.



Last week, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke at a campaign rally for Democrat Martha Coakley and told her liberal audience “don’t let anybody tell you it’s corporations and businesses that create jobs.” On Monday night, the entire panel on Fox News’ Special Report w/ Bret Baier eagerly mocked Ms. Clinton's comments with Chuck Lane of the Washington Post joking that he “thought NBC created a job for Chelsea so there is at least one corporation that has created a job.” 



When far-left, white, British comedic actor Russell Brand scolded a black WSJ political commentator, Jason Riley as “freakish” and a “betrayer” of his race for not buying into the liberal narrative on the death of Michael Brown, Brand probably didn’t realize how racist and arrogant he came across.

In the video posted to Brand’s Youtube channel Aug. 21, he mocks Riley’s “white” sounding voice and mimicked Riley, saying,“I am a convenient African American who will betray my racial roots for Fox News!” Since the mainstream media never reports on these revealing confessions made by liberal actors, Greg Gutfeld did on Fox News’ “The Five,”Aug. 26.  



Filling in as host on NBC’s Meet the Press, Andrea Mitchell, NBC's Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent and host of MSNBC's Andrea Mitchell Reports, rushed to defend her colleague Al Sharpton for his involvement in the Ferguson protests.

During a discussion with the Wall Street Journal’s Jason Riley, Mitchell declared that Sharpton was in Ferguson “on a peace mission” and not in the words of Riley to “continue to blame whites” for the death of Michael Brown. [See video below.] 



The editorial page of the Wall Street Journal has long been an indispensable voice of conservatism. As President Bush said in 2003 in awarding the Medal of Freedom to editorial page editor Robert L. Bartley shortly before his death, he—and by extension his editorial page—has been "a champion of free markets, individual liberty and the values necessary for a free society."

But there is one area in which the editorial page's policy diverges strikingly from conservative orthodoxy, and that is on the matter of immigration. To varying degrees, the paper's editorialists have argued in favor of a more flexible attitude toward immigration. That tendency reaches its apotheosis in the recently-released book by WSJ editorial board member Jason Riley: Let Them In: The Case for Open Borders.

Riley appeared on this weekend's Journal Editorial Report on FNC to discuss his book with host Paul Gigot and make the case that borders should indeed be opened. Riley seemed surprisingly passive in the defense of his controversial proposal, and I personally came away unpersuaded. Here was the exchange.

View video here.