New York Times' Rome bureau chief Jason Horowitz travelled with Pope Francis on the pope’s recent round-trip to Africa. Horowitz’s previous reporting clearly shows his affection for the politically left-wing emphases of this pope, especially on migrant rights and the environment, and a mutual hostility to American critics. Under two datelines marked “Aboard The Papal Plane,” Horowitz let Pope Francis fly, nodding along to the pontiff’s left-wing political views versus "ultraconservative" American Catholics.



In Sunday’s New York Times, the paper’s Vatican-beat reporter Jason Horowitz brought his usual caffeinated anti-conservative labeling habit to a story sketching out a clash over migrants in Italy pitting “far-right...ultra-conservative” Catholics like Cardinal Raymond Burke against the liberal views of Pope Francis: “As the Pope Champions Migrants, Some Cardinals Court the Far Right.”: "When the far-right Italian politician Matteo Salvini rose to testify that he hoped to be a better Christian despite being a divorced and first-class 'sinner,' one of the ultraconservative cardinals most critical of the pope smiled and clapped on the dais behind him."



Perhaps wary of Donald Trump’s 2016 victory, international reporters at the New York Times are seeing the “far right” everywhere, in unlikely guises, such as supporting being allowed to eat and drink whatever one likes without government interference. The paper filed an odd story: “Finland’s Right Appeals to Voters With a Nihilistic View on Climate.” In Italy, it found "a far-right attempt to eschew civility and make meanness cool.” In Norway, freedom to eat and smoke were likened to the far right.



The New York Times’ interest in the awful details of the emerging sexual abuse and pedophilia scandal in the Catholic Church took a dumbfounding, ideologically motivated turn, after a conservative cleric released a bombshell letter alleging a coverup of sexual assault aided by liberal Pope Francis. Jason Horowitz, Rome bureau chief, amazingly turned to attacking that whistleblower, Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, as "an ideologically motivated opposition" member who has "weaponized the church’s sex abuse crisis." Horowitz smeared him as a conservative crank in two consecutive front-page stories, with a tone suggesting a “right-wing conspiracy” is afoot to unfairly dethrone the blameless, inclusive pope.



The media simply adore Pope Francis, that is when they can selectively report on his comments to push their liberal agenda. Following the formula, Vogue recently posted an article by Jason Horowitz claiming that “Pope Francis is Changing the Church.”



Stirring the political controversy in the Vatican, New York Times Rome bureau chief Jason Horowitz once again gleefully pitted Pope Francis against “ultraconservative” Catholics in Tuesday’s “Pope Puts Caring for Migrants and Opposing Abortion on Equal Footing.” Horowitz used the Pope's newest apostolic exhortation to sharpen the conflict, crediting Francis with "citing vicious examples of defamation in some Catholic outlets" by Church conservatives.



The New York Times starkly revealed its disparate, biased, and hopelessly confused treatment of fascist and socialist ideologies on Saturday, with Trump indirectly lumped in with European fascist parties. Reporter Jason Horowitz was featured on Saturday’s front page, “In Italian Campaign, Gravity of Far Right Exerts Its Strongest Pull.” Horowitz threw out plenty of “far-right” and “hard right” labels to describe some of the unsavory populist parties emerging in Europe. But on the same front page, White House correspondent Peter Baker also used “hard right” to describe the Trump administration’s policy moves. Meanwhile, another reporter celebrated a popular German socialist and knocked "trickle-down economics."



President Trump, fulfilling a promise that other presidents have made but failed to keep, recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and started the process of moving the American Embassy from Tel Aviv. Times reporters were predictably aghast, both downplaying Jewish ties to Jerusalem and warning of violence and endangement of the non-existent "peace process."



New York Times’ hard-left political reporter Jason Horowitz slimed President Trump’s chief strategist Steve Bannon, based on a second-hand reference in a speech Bannon gave two years ago. The distortion appeared in Sunday’s paper under the bias-on-steroids headline, “Fascists Too Lax for a Philosopher Cited by Bannon.” Bannon’s actual 2014 speech revealed that he’s not wholly on board with European far-right beliefs and actions. Bannon also called Vladimir Putin and his “cronies” an imperialist kleptocracy. But that didn’t stop the Times from attacking one of the mainstream media’s favorite enemies in the Trump White House.



Colorful New York Times political reporter Jason Horowitz let his left-wing ideological flags fly with three stories on consecutive days --a "venemous" Donld Trump rally, a cyptically hostile Carly Fiorina profile, and a chiding of Bernie Sanders for being insufficiently fiery on gay rights in the 1990s. Horowitz held Fiorina's childhood continent-hopping against her candidacy: "That family pedigree and worldly past is politically inconvenient in a campaign climate that prizes anti-establishment outsiders and a strong dose of nativism."



In preparation for Tuesday's Democratic debate in Las Vegas, the New York Times Sunday offered side-by-side profiles by Jason Horowitz and Amy Chozick documenting the brilliance and tenacity of the top two Democratic candidates, Sen. Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton. This goop was offered as a front-page tease: "He's So Confident. She's So Prepared. Senator Bernie Sanders and Hillary Rodham Clinton will use debate skills on Tuesday that have been honed over decades."



Jason Horowitz, one of the New York Times more colorful reporters, gave Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker a gleeful finger upon his departure from the Republican presidential race, suggesting Walker has advanced his career on racist appeals in "Dismal Finish Is a Fitting Result, Old Foes Say." Horowitz wrote on Tuesday: "Old political adversaries of Mr. Walker greeted his dour denouement as a fitting result for a politician who they say began and furthered his career here with a divisive style, a penchant for turning out conservative supporters rather than working with opponents, and tacit racial appeals in one of the nation’s most segregated cities. But the irony is that Mr. Walker was eclipsed by candidates who have ignited the Republican base with more overtly nativist and, their critics argue, racist appeals." Those "racist appeals"? Actually tough-on-crime proposals targeted at victims of crime in Milwaukee.