Freshman Senator Josh Hawley (R., Mo.) has penned a letter to Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, calling on the Big Tech exec to allow an audit for anti-conservative bias. Hawley has made a name for himself in numerous recent cases as a conservative watchdog against the overreach of big tech, but the censorship of a pro-life movie’s Twitter account moved him to action. National Review obtained an exclusive copy on April 3 that showed Hawley scorching Twitter for its bias and demanding an investigation. 



Twitter is getting ready to make major changes that are already being criticized as new ways to limit speech and benefit what the company CEO calls “healthy conversation.” Twitter unveiled new changes at the SXSW (South by SouthWest) tech conference being experimented within their Twttr app to be implemented into the main Twitter platform. The company hasmet swift criticism from conservatives like Lila Rose who blasted them for making the platform “more hostile to diversity of ideas.”



Twitter CEO controls what people say on his platform. He found out he doesn’t have the same power appearing on the latest episode of the Joe Rogan podcast. It  featured Rogan and journalist Tim Pool teaming up against representatives from Twitter in a fiery debate that has since gone viral. Rogan and Pool blasted Dorsey on everything from banning conservatives over “learn to code” to threats against the Covington Catholic High School students. Dorsey was joined on the defense with its head of Twitter’s “Trust and Safety” Vijaya Gadde.



Conservatives note that an avowed anti-Semite like Louis Farrakhan maintains a Twitter account while a gaggle of conservatives no longer do. Think Anthony Cumia, Owen Benjamin, Roger Stone, Sabo, “Gay Patriot” Bruce Carroll, Gavin McInnes and Laura Loomer. Former Republican candidate Jesse Kelly became the most recent example.



Twitter seems to be unprepared to deal with answering Congress’ questions, so instead it  backed off. The platform caused an uproar on November 25 when it permanently banned conservative pundit and former enlisted Jesse Kelly without explanation.



The female co-hosts of ABC’s The View are certainly no strangers to controversy, but on Thursday, the panelists turned their attention from mostly liberal topics to criticizing Twitter for allowing numerous harsh posts to remain on the social network website. The discussion took a deeply personal tone when conservative co-host Meghan McCain described what she went through when a doctored photo invaded her grief after her father -- Arizona Senator John McCain -- passed away in late August.



So much for Twitter being the “free speech wing of the free speech party.” Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey couldn’t have distanced himself further from that famous 2012 quote. He told a “Wired 25” audience Tuesday that the original quote “was a joke.”

In 2012, then-Twitter UK General Manager Tony Wang told a media summit that the company tried to be “neutral” because of its principles. "Generally, we remain neutral as to the content because our general counsel and CEO like to say that we are the free speech wing of the free speech party," he explained.



On Wednesday, MRC’s Dan Gainor appeared alongside tech expert Lance Ulanoff on Fox Business’ After the Bell to discuss Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey’s testimony before Congress. At the hearing the Dorsey denied any allegations that there was censorship of conservatives, however Gainor insisted that this was contrary to the evidence.



During Wednesday’s Senate hearing concerning foreign influence on social media platforms, Twitter founder and CEO Jack Dorsey stated that his goal in combating the proliferation of fake or misleading accounts was to amplify the voices of active journalists on the site. That’s nice, but since Dorsey has admitted his company is “left-leaning,” we’re left to wonder which journalists he wants to promote.



It’s worth asking big tech companies whether they practice core American values on a global scale. In the Sept. 5, Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on social media, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) asked Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg whether their respective companies were built on “the tenet of freedom of expression.”



RESTON, VA — On August 31, Media Research Center founder and president Brent Bozell sent individual letters to House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Greg Walden (R-OR) and Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr (R-NC) concerning Wednesday’s hearings on social media platforms featuring officials from Facebook, Google and Twitter. 



In the competition of ideas, you can't win the game if you're not on the playing field. That's why Silicon Valley bigwigs' stubborn refusal to put business above their own personal partisan biases doesn't just rankle. It reeks. Equal access to social media is not just about sharing food pics, pet videos, makeup tutorials and travelogues. It's about ensuring the ability to disseminate and distribute political speech on the world's biggest platforms.