The New York Times estimates transgender people make up, “0.6 percent of the adult population.” This doesn’t stop activists from bashing Hollywood for not catering to them. GLAAD and 5050by2020, led by Jill Soloway, creator of Transparent, an Amazon series starring a man playing a transgender woman, got “four dozen production companies, talent agencies, film studios, and advocacy groups” to show their “support for expanded LGBTQ representation." 



The Trans Moment is here, with less than one percent of the population is now calling the cultural shots for the entertainment industry. Pressured by LGBTQ groups and their allies, Scarlett Johansson recently stepped down from her role as a trans person in the film Rub & Tug.



The push for “rights” goes above and beyond a Supreme Court decision, apparently.

 



Did you notice an awful lot of gay characters in movies during 2017? If so, you’re an ignorant bigot. According to the analysts at GLAAD, all major Hollywood studios performed poorly in terms of forwarding the gay agenda on the big screen. Oh sure, there were two movies entirely dedicated to gay themes, but “Love, Simon” and “Call Me By Your Name” are not enough.

 


GLAAD, the thought police for all things gay, has its knickers in a twist because Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, has been named to the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom. Perkins was nominated to the commission by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. In a May 15 tweet, GLAAD described Perkins as an “Anti-LGBTQ hate group leader.”



Its startling to see who is considered influential in the media and entertainment industry. At the GLAAD Media Awards in New York City on May 5, director Ava DuVernay spoke about the importance of activism in art. The filmmaker, who just finished a film for Disney (A Wrinkle In Time) called the United States a “leaderless country” and indirectly hit at current politicians for what she considered to be their failures.

 



For the past week, GLAAD has been in the process of awarding certain sections of the media for being particularly sympathetic to LGBTQ issues during the past year. As far as nominations for journalism go, it turns out that the GLAAD Media Awards is indebted to major media networks, such as CBS, ABC, and NBC.



Next time you’re stuck in an airport (the only time most people subject themselves to CNN) and Don Lemon is on, pretending to be a reasonable, unbiased journalist,  remember his September 9 award speech from at the GLAAD (Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation) San Francisco Gala -- the one where he responded, “Thank you, it’s about time!”

 



The media are getting political – and aren’t afraid to boast about it. At least when it comes to President Trump. On Saturday, GLAAD (formerly Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation) hosted its 28th annual media awards ceremony in New York City. In addition to handing out 34 media awards, GLAAD featured media figures who focused their energy on attacking “very bad” President Trump – beginning with actress Debra Messing.



Twenty years ago today, Ellen DeGeneres revealed her sexual identity on network TV. In 1997, the media climate was not nearly as welcoming to LGBT people as it is now; however, as proven by the countless articles published commemorating her bravery, times have clearly changed. Today, LGBT content is not only accepted, but celebrated. 



When it comes to media portrayal, the LGBT community has one mission: promoting complete and total acceptance. Tolerance is no longer enough. No surprise then that GLAAD's 2017 Media Awards Show theme  is "Accelerating Acceptance." 



The slander of President Ronald Reagan’s legacy by liberal gay activists continues. After ignoring his influence in stopping California’s Prop 6 as governor, President Reagan is painted as a homophobe unwilling to acknowledge or help gays during the height of the AIDS crisis. This characterization of a conservative legend has been debunked but that still hasn’t stopped the liberal gay activists who choose to re-write history in the ABC gay propaganda miniseries When We Rise.