In an encore of their performance from earlier in the day CBS and NBC heaped their praises on to President Barack Obama Tuesday evening. “He eulogized the slain police officers of Dallas, but he seized this moment of national attention to plea for reason from both sides of a racial divide,” proclaimed Anchor Scott Pelley on CBC Evening News. Pelley seemed to be in awe of the president during his report. 



During a lengthy interview with a reporter from the Adweek magazine and website, Bill O'Reilly of the Fox News Channel discussed several topics, including the fact that he will not attend the Republican National Convention in Cleveland July 18-21 because he thinks the event will be “boring.”

When asked why he believes that, the host of the top-rated weeknight news program -- The O'Reilly Factor -- for the past 16 years responded: “Hillary's going to get up there, and she's going to be coronated. Maybe there'll be some Bernie fans, and he'll get his night to speak.” However, he noted "the big story” of both the Republican and Democratic gatherings will be who is selected vice president.



The New York Times took a witheringly anti-Trump, anti-Bush, anti-Reagan stand on the front page of the Sunday Review. Veteran liberal journalist Michael Tomasky contributed, “No More Fear – Has political scaremongering lost its magic?” By “scaremongering,” Tomasky is talking about the Republican Party’s traditional tough stand against terrorism. Contributor Kevin Baker went further, falsely stating that "race-baiting" Ronald Reagan had launched his campaign at “an all-white gathering” in Mississippi.



Taking a cue from the Associated Press's Martin Crutsinger in March of last year, two Los Angeles Times reporters told readers on Monday that the economy is about to complete a seventh year of expansion. No it's not, at least not if historical benchmarks for determining expansions are consistently and properly heeded.

Reporters Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee couldn't even keep their own standards for expansion straight, as seen in this damning sentence: "The economy has been growing for 84 months, a stretch that is well above the 58-month average post-World War II expansion." No it hasn't, and no it isn't.



Philip Bump and the Washington Post have apparently had a couple of pretty bad days. The Post had to endure having to cover, and cover for, an absolutely awful jobs report released Friday morning. That news made their beloved Dear Leader, who had just celebrated the allegedly wonderful economic accomplishments seen during his presidency on Wednesday, look quite foolish. Never fear: By Paragraph 4 of its related story, the Post found an "expert" who claimed that "This just does not square with all the other things we’re seeing in the economy." Actually, the job market has been virtually the only exception to otherwise uniformly weak data since the fourth quarter of last year.

Perhaps partially influenced by the bad jobs news, Bump, who toils at the Post's "The Fix" blog, came completely unhinged in reacting to a Thursday evening retweet by presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.



A Pew Research report published three weeks ago on America’s Shrinking Middle Class presented a fundamentally misleading narrative which the press was only too eager to relay and continues to use, namely that the middle class has been seriously shrinking since the turn of the century. Christopher Rugaber at the Associated Press typified the initial press coverage, writing: "In nearly one-quarter of metro areas, middle-class adults no longer make up a majority ... That sharp shift reflects a broader erosion that occurred from 2000 through 2014."

The not particularly subtle message: "It all started with George W. Bush, and it hasn't let up since then." This post will disprove and thus discredit that notion.



In an episode about America’s porous borders in which 18 FBI recruits successfully slip across the border undetected without any proper planning, Quantico’s writers made sure to slip in a few digs at President George W. Bush and former Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin.



In August 2008, presidential candidate Barack Obama pledged, as paraphrased in a New York Times story, "not to use signing statements to undermine legislation passed by Congress," and "called Mr. Bush’s frequent use of such statements an abuse of his power."

On Wednesday, Obama issued another signing statement — there have now been over 30 during his presidential tenure — to put a thumb in Israel's eye, and to give aid and comfort to the misguided international anti-Israel BDS (boycott, divestment, sanctions) movement. The establishment press is minimizing its exposure of Obama's move, and, as usual, utterly failing to note Obama's about-face on signing statements since he took office.



The correct notion that President Bush's presidency post-9/11 saw no successful terror attacks on American soil is simply Republican "religion" among the party faithful, MSNBC Hardball host Chris Matthews scoffed on his February 17 program.



Once upon a time, Martin Longman didn’t think Republicans were so bad, but that was before the Tea Party, before the Iraq war, before Fox News became a major force. The Washington Monthly blogger detailed his decades of disillusionment in a Tuesday post.

According to Longman, events which eroded his belief that Republicans were “decent people” included the “excesses of the Gingrich Revolution”; the “giant looting exercise” that GOPers allegedly executed during George W. Bush’s administration; and John McCain’s selection of Sarah Palin. He also argued that “Donald Trump actually is an ideological match for the modern conservative movement” given that movement conservatives are motivated less by philosophical principle than by “1) fear 2) hatred 3) greed and 4) a need to be led…Trump encapsulates those almost perfectly.”



Appearing as a guest on Friday's Morning Joe on MSNBC, former ABC This Week co-host Cokie Roberts -- currently a political commentator with the network -- made an unusually blunt slam against opponents of amnesty for illegal immigrants as she suggested that conservatives who opposed the left-leaning George W. Bush plan were not among those who "had a brain." She also provocatively warned that the GOP "can't keep winning by being a bunch of old, grumpy white men."



Tuesday’s Tonight Show featured two actors known for having portrayed politicians with Josh Brolin and Kate McKinnon as Brolin touted his desire to never meet former President George W. Bush (after playing him in Oliver Stone’s W.) and McKinnon swooned that Hillary Clinton was “literally a dreamboat” as “[s]he’s one of my favorite people.”