At the Democratic convention, Bill Clinton accused Republicans of fabricating a “cartoon alternative” to the real Hillary Clinton. The Washington Monthly’s Martin Longman claims that Democrats don’t need to create cartoon versions of conservatives since there’s already “something cartoonish about the right,” and in that regard Donald Trump “seems like a natural successor” to Sarah Palin and (wait for it) Ronald Reagan and (wait again) Dwight Eisenhower. Conservatism, concluded Longman, has “always been a charade. It’s also a cloak or a mask for selfishness and greed that they gussy up in Bill Buckley style and sell us as intellectualism."



A major event that would damage Barack Obama’s presidency as much as Hurricane Katrina did George W. Bush’s is a white whale for conservatives, suggests Brian Beutler: They’re constantly, eagerly scanning the horizon for it, but they’ll never see it. Beutler finds it hard to imagine that any Democratic president would have his or her own Katrina, since Dems have made responding to natural disasters a high priority. Not so the pro-small government, austerity-driven Republicans, who are “ideologically ill-suited to meet [that] challenge.”



In a pre-recorded report shown on Friday's Anderson Cooper 360 on CNN, correspondent Gary Tuchman recalled examples of "dirty campaigning" in presidential elections going back 200 years, but, when he got to more recent elections, he focused on negative campaigning from the Republican side -- citing Richard Nixon, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush and Donald Trump -- while ignoring infamous examples from the left except for current candidate Hillary Clinton.



Many liberals are certain that a Donald Trump presidency would be an unprecedented fiasco, but The Washington Monthly’s D.R. Tucker isn’t among them. In a Sunday post, Tucker suggested that in terms of racism and overall “incompetence,” a Trump administration would be a sort of sequel to George W. Bush’s, and speculated that Republicans who are backing Hillary Clinton may be, “on a very subtle psychological level…acknowledging that [Trump] would equal, if not surpass, Dubya in his dimwittedness.”



Rachel Maddow gave covering fire for President Obama on her MSNBC show on Thursday over his initial decision to stay in Martha's Vineyard instead of visiting flood-stricken Louisiana. Maddow spotlighted the "scathing editorial" from a Lousiana newspaper criticizing the Democrat over the move, but defended the President by pointing a finger at former Governor Bobby Jindal.



Former MSNBC pundit Wolffe is now a columnist for the U.S. edition of the left-wing British newspaper The Guardian. This past Tuesday, he declared that “we already have a winner in the 2016 election…Someone the pundits wrote off long ago…An unconventional politician… His name is Barack Obama. And he can thank the freak show that is Donald Trump’s Republican party for restoring his stature as a unifying, national leader with a moderated and mature approach to a complex and unstable world.”



Arianna Huffington, who in 2010 said Americans were voting republican with their “lizard brains,” announced on Aug 11 that she would step down as Editor-in-Chief at her left-wing website.



History is apparently subject to revision without notice and without basis at the Associated Press.

In an outrageous report primarily dedicated to the notion that Donald Trump's concerns about the November general elections possibly being rigged thanks to potential voter fraud "challenges (the) U.S. Democratic system" — but a whole host of leftist-inspired rigging efforts apparently don't — Vivian Salama at the Associated Press informed readers in a later paragraph that Al Gore, according to "several post-mortem reviews," "would have won" the 2000 presidential election if "undervotes" had all been counted.



In a few months, Barack Obama will become the fifth post-World War II president to serve two full terms. The Washington Monthly’s Martin Longman thinks Obama tops the other four in terms of “popularity and moral credibility,” as indicated not only by the positive reception Obama got for his Wednesday-night DNC speech boosting Hillary Clinton, but by the public’s curiosity beforehand about what he’d have to say. In a Thursday post, Longman contrasted Obama with the other two-termers at their last convention as POTUS.



Wednesday's NBC Nightly News followed the example of CBS the previous evening in spotlighting the latest Republican presidential candidate to get in trouble with a liberal musician for using their music at a campaign event. Peter Alexander zeroed in on how "just hours after [Donald] Trump tried to cast himself as a winner, Queen complained the billionaire used the song 'against our wishes.'" He also cited how "George W. Bush had to 'back down,' after receiving a cease and desist letter from Tom Petty."



President Obama’s speech at a memorial service for the five police officers assassinated in Dallas while patrolling a Black Lives Matter protest led Wednesday’s New York Times. The paper portrayed Obama flatteringly as having “spoke hard truths to both sides” at the service, while downplaying how the President politicized the memorial by thumping for gun-control, ranting about how a Glock pistol was easier to get than a book. The story was unnecessarily sycophantic, while tamping down criticism of Obama’s politicized tone: “Obama Consoles And Challenges A Shaken Nation." The Times also failed to catch -- then conveniently excised -- a flubbed Biblical quotation by Obama.



It's a safe prediction that there will be renewed interest in the federal government's perilous financial situation if the country elects someone not named Hillary Clinton as its next president in November.

One reason why this prediction is so safe is how little interest there has been in even covering today's news about Uncle Sam's troubling June surplus of only $6.3 billion. The Associated Press, via Martin Crutsinger, devoted three whole paragraphs to the news during the first two hours after its release before lengthening it with the usual static analysis pablum about the presidential candidates' tax plans. A 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time Google News search on "deficit," which encouraged users to "Explore in Depth (9 more articles)," returned only three additional items when I followed that suggestion.