On Tuesday, CBS This Morning went gaga over liberal comedian Jon Stewart's and the 17 years of his Daily Show. Charlie Rose gushed that "it became, for all of us, a, kind of, cultural event — more than a show." He later added, "There was nothing quite like him. A lot of people did it very well....But Jon had a special place." Rose, along with Gayle King and Norah O'Donnell, later marveled over the show's "extraordinary collection" of comedians. The newscast also touted several clips of the Comedy Central program mocking Republicans.



Major similarities between the 2016 presidential election and that of 2000 don’t end with the Democrat winning the popular vote but losing the electoral vote, claims Marcotte, who contended that the media had it in for Hillary Clinton the same way they did for Al Gore, and that in each case biased campaign coverage was a factor in driving down Democratic voter turnout. Regarding this year’s race, Marcotte remarked, “Replace ‘I invented the internet’ with ‘emails,’ ‘Naomi Wolf’ with ‘pneumonia’ and ‘Ralph Nader’ with ‘Jill Stein,’ and you’re looking at a rerun.”



It’s okay to call President Obama cool again, according to NBC’s Superstore. Quite the change from 2012 when almost anything said about him was considered racist, including the word “cool.”



On Friday's Real Time on HBO, far left host Bill Maher seemed to be in a panic over the possibility that Donald Trump will be elected President, as he repeatedly hit on his worries that there is a "slow-moving, right-wing coup" that will bring to power a "fascist" President Trump, even going so far as to invoke the Rwanda genocide of the 1990s and Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler. Maher even ended up admitting that he and other liberals "cried wolf" in their attacks on President George W. Bush and GOP candidates Mitt Romney and John McCain, calling it a "big mistake" on their part.



A decade ago, the press burned through tons of newsprint, hours and hours of broadcast time, and huge amounts of Internet bandwidth obsessing over the possibility that Karl Rove, President George W. Bush's closest adviser, would be indicted in connection with the alleged revelation of the name of CIA agent Valerie Plame.



We all know the George W. Bush years were hard for liberals, but EPIX takes Bush Derangement Syndrome to a whole new level with their new original series Graves.



In a totally gratuitous move, Monday’s season two premiere of CW’s Supergirl (formerly on CBS) referenced a past American president to imply stupidity. Guess which one. 



According to one left-of-center blogger and one right-of-center professor, a major takeaway from the 2016 presidential contest is that ideological conservatism is unpopular, even in the Republican party. Samuel Goldman, a political-science prof at the George Washington University and a frequent contributor to The American Conservative, stated that the “great message” of Donald Trump’s campaign “is that there really are not that many movement conservatives” in the sense of average Americans “who are vested in a conventional combination of limited government, a relatively hawkish foreign policy, and a sort of religiously inflected public morality.” From the left, The Washington Monthly’s Martin Longman alleged that for most Republicans, policy ideas take a back seat to raw resentment: “‘Small government’ and ‘local control’ and ‘free enterprise’ and the rest of the GOP’s ideological playbook simply never had much appeal to their base except as signifiers for Trumpian impulses to smash outsiders and oddballs and anyone who discomforts them.”



A current hot topic in campaign coverage is Hillary Clinton’s underperformance among millennials, an unusually large number of whom favor the second-tier candidates, Gary Johnson and Jill Stein. Brian Beutler thinks those 18-to-29-year-olds who aren’t #WithHer don’t grasp what happened the last time a significant portion of the left was lukewarm about the Democratic nominee: 2000, when lefty votes for Ralph Nader cost Al Gore the White House. Should some millennials’ non-support of Clinton lead to a Donald Trump presidency, argued Beutler, “it will be the consequence of a liberal failure to build an oral tradition around the Bush administration…[the] plutocratic fiscal policy; the 9/11 intelligence failure; the war of choice in Iraq sold with false intelligence and launched without an occupation plan; the malpractice that killed hundreds in New Orleans; the scandalousness that makes the fainting couch routine over Clinton’s emails seem Oscar-worthy; and finally to the laissez-faire regulatory regime and ensuing financial crisis that continues to shape the economic lives of young voters to this day.”



Many consider Donald Trump an anomaly in the Republican party, but they really shouldn’t, suggested New York’s Chait in a Tuesday piece. Chait argued that the GOP which nominated Trump for president is pretty much the same GOP which has freaked out for several years over the Affordable Care Act. As Chait put it, “Republican hatred of Obamacare exemplifies the madness that left its elite unable to stop Trump.”



To borrow the title of a Clint Eastwood movie, liberals are having trouble with the curve -- specifically, the curve which they claim the media are using to grade Donald Trump. President Obama and Paul Krugman are among those who’ve raised that objection. Esquire blogger Pierce agrees with them, but he also asserted in a Sunday post that the media’s supposedly lenient treatment of Trump is “nothing new…Hell, we've been grading Republicans on a curve for decades. We graded Reagan on a curve when he burbled about trees and air pollution…We graded [George W. Bush] on a curve for the whole 2000 campaign when he didn't know Utah from Uzbekistan, but Al Gore knew too much stuff and what fun was he, anyway? We graded Republicans on a curve when they attached themselves to the remnants of American apartheid.”



It's clear that GQ.com isn't at all interested in consistency, and that it doesn't care if it gets caught employing a blatant double standard. Catching them at it was just too easy. In the wake of the latest reported incident involving President Barack Obama's 18 year-old daughter Malia — she has been photographed while playing the drinking game Pong in Maryland, a state where, as in the rest of the country, the legal drinking age is 21 — GQ writer Jay Willis has demanded that the press "Stop Snitching on Malia Obama, Y'All" (an ironic headline given the primary object of his wrath is the UK Daily Mail, where "y'all" is not exactly a commonly heard contraction). In 2005, GQ.com, in what appears to have been a house editorial, was still going after George W. Bush's daughters, while referring back to their 2001 citations for underage drinking.