What better way to squash a young, woke bisexual woman’s enthusiasm for being a spokesperson for a skin care company than to tell her that the company’s CEO contributed money to the Family Research Center? That is exactly what happened in the July 24 episode of Freeform’s The Bold Type titled “Plan B,” when the FRC is called one of those "racist, anti-LGBTQ groups."



The media are mischaracterizing a Supreme Court case by reporting a “false image,” according to the sponsor of a SCOTUS rally supporting Christian baker Jack Phillips. On Tuesday, the United States Supreme Court heard the oral arguments in the Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission case. The case surrounds Jack Phillips, a Christian cake designer in Colorado, who refused to create a wedding reception cake for a gay couple, David Mullins and Charlie Craig, in 2012.



On Sunday afternoon, MSNBC Live displayed another classic example of how the inclusion of Republican analysts on the liberal news network is seldomly about providing a dissenting point of view, but instead to contribute additional liberal bias on top of that already coming from out-of-the-closet liberal analysts. When far-left former DNC chairman Howard Dean gave analysis in which he hyperbolically called former White House advisor Steve Bannon a "Nazi sympathizer," fellow guest Susan Del Percio -- a Republican strategist and frequent MSNBC guest often paired with Dean on weekends -- voiced agreement with her liberal counterpart's analysis while fretting that Bannon will hurt the Republican party.



Newsweek, whose home page of late devotes every square pixel to anti-Trump-pro-liberal articles, featured a Harriet Sinclair piece Thursday on President Trump’s then-upcoming speech to the Family Research Council’s Values Voter Summit. Or, as the magazine’s hit-piece of a headline called it, “Donald Trump To Speak At Hate Group's Annual Event, A First For A President.” Seriously? (Newsweek ran a similar "hate group" headline after Trump's speech.) Newsweek relied on the Southern Poverty Law Center for its “hate group” designation. Amazing in its absence is any mention of Floyd Lee Corkins, who in August 2012, using SPLC’s “hate map” as a guide, burst into the headquarters of the Family Research Council in Washington, D.C. with the intention of assassinating the employees of the social conservative Christian organization.



An organization smearing conservative and faith-based organizations as “hate groups” is acting like the “left’s pit bull,” according to one leader in the conservative movement.



Conservative leaders are calling out the liberal media for a dangerous hypocrisy: While media outlets readily promote an organization locating conservative and faith-based organizations on a “hate map,” they would never do the same for a map of abortion providers.



Family Research Council just released a report on the American society’s ongoing hostility toward religion – and it’s remarkably troubling. According to FRC, American hostility toward religion increased by 76 percent just since 2014 – much thanks to left-leaning media’s poor representation of religious attitudes.



Saturday’s women’s march doesn’t stand for all women, according to pro-life women leaders. In exclusive statements, national pro-life leaders called the upcoming Women’s March on Washington hypocritical for excluding pro-life women while claiming to stand for all women. Pro-life groups Students for Life, Susan B. Anthony List and Family Research Council all chimed in. From criticizing the march for becoming a “Protect Planned Parenthood” event and marginalizing women to calling out the media’s gushing coverage, they emphasized the march doesn’t represent them.



CNN's Don Lemon acted more like a socially-left activist than a journalist on Friday's New Day, as he moderated a panel discussion on a proposed religious liberty law in Mississippi. Lemon twice misrepresented what the law actually says, and asked a LGBT activist, "Religious liberty — is that just a code for discrimination — I don't want to provide services to certain people? Isn't that just a code?" He was more explicit later in the segment: "People in certain professions...wouldn't have to serve certain people — which, at its base, is discrimination."



CNN's Chris Cuomo again acted like a LGBT activist on Monday's New Day, as he interviewed Peter Sprigg from the socially conservative Family Research Council. Cuomo raised the specter of Jim Crow when he claimed that a proposed First Amendment Defense Act in Congress "does smack familiar to what happened in the wake of the miscegenation laws and the civil rights laws, where ...some cited the Bible; some stated religion – and said, it's against my beliefs. I shouldn't have to participate."



As the Big Three networks were touting President Obama's claim that climate change affects the health of children – including that of his own daughter – on Wednesday, their morning and evening newscasts have yet to report on the politician's criticism of many Christians during a Tuesday prayer breakfast. Mr. Obama underlined that "on Easter, I do reflect on the fact that as a Christian, I am supposed to love. And I have to say that sometimes, when I listen to less-than-loving expressions by Christians, I get concerned."



How’s this for timing? The Washington Post’s Valerie Strauss, on the two-year-anniversary of the FRC shooting, launched its own attack on FRC – with the help of a study released by the Southern Poverty Law Center, the same group that inspired that shooter. 

Here’s a quick recap: on August 15, 2012, a gunman entered the lobby of the Family Research Council in Washington D.C, planning to kill everyone inside the building and then smear Chick-Fil-A sandwiches in their faces (at the time, Chick-Fil-A was under fire for comments that its CEO, Dan Cathy, had made in support of traditional marriage). The gunman’s plot was only foiled by the quick thinking of the building manager, Leo Johnson, who ended up taking a bullet in the arm in the process.