The New York Times burnished its reputation for hostility toward religion with a crass tweet that denigrated the American family of Mormons, massacred by a drug cartel in Mexico, as they were traveling in an SUV caravan on Monday. Six children and three women were killed. The Times tweeted the story out on Tuesday afternoon with negative connotations of the women and children victims: 



New York Times religion reporter Elizabeth Dias went to Kentucky to see how the locals were handling the unearned vitriol aimed at their sons at Covington Catholic High School after the viral video of the infamous confrontation at the Lincoln Memorial, for Tuesday’s “A Digital-Era Frenzy Sweeps Up a School Steeped in Tradition.” While the mainstream media has been forced to back off their more inflammatory and false charges against the boys, who were abused and confronted by both the Black Israelites and a drumming Native American activist, Dias maintained a churlish tone:



The New York Times is still leading the cheers for Democrat Beto O’Rourke in his quest to unseat Texas Sen. Ted Cruz in November. In Wednesday’s lead story for the National section, Elizabeth Dias devoted 1,900 words to sudden respect for Christian evangelicals: “In Deep-Red Texas, Evangelical Women Trickle Toward O’Rourke -- Citing moral imperative to fight Trump’s agenda.”



The New York Times’ co-lead story naturally dealt with the Kavanaugh controversy: “Nominee’s Fate Is Pivotal Point In U.S. Politics – An Apex in the Struggle Over Women’s Status.” Reporters portrayed Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination, and last-minute sexual-assault accusations, through the prism of Kavanaugh taking away women’s rights through gutting Roe v. Wade as a future member of the Supreme Court, and sexist male Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee failing to believe a wronged woman.



The New York Times, which is always eager to help Republican candidates, insisted Marsha Blackburn would be making a tactical error in emphasizing her pro-life bona fides as the GOP’s candidate for U.S. Senate in Tennessee. Last month Dias embraced identity politics by celebrating Rashida Tlaib’s Democratic primary victory in Detroit. But the paper’s support for women only goes only to those with a “D” before their name.



Indulging in obvious identify politics in Wednesday’s New York Times, reporter Elizabeth Dias celebrated Rashida Tlaib’s Democratic primary victory in Detroit right along with her supporters in “Candidate’s Palestinian Heritage Infuses Sense of Community in Detroit.” Already, her story offers a remarkable counterpoint to anti-Muslim policy and sentiment rising around the country, and especially to President Trump, who has banned travel from several majority-Muslim countries....Ms. Tlaib, 42, represents a new addition to the mosaic of American politics."



Reporters Liam Stack and Elizabeth Dias offered a Thursday New York Times story headlined “Why the Supreme Court Opening Could Affect Gay Marriage as Well as Abortion.” Besides taking sides on the issue of gay marriage, resumed the paper’s bad habit of superfluous ideological labeling, with ten “conservative” references in the 1,200-word report compared to a single “liberal” label, in the first sentence. After that, the paper referred to the left-wing support for gay marriage with the friendly term “L.G.B.T. groups.”



As two major Supreme Court decisions, on the travel ban and an abortion/free-speech question, were settled with 5-4 majorities, the New York Times devoted a front-page story to Trump’s selection of Supreme Court pick Neil Gorsuch, while anguishing over the Republican decision not to give then-President Obama’s nominee Merrick Garland a hearing in 2016, in “G.O.P. Tactics in 2016 Pay Off in Gorsuch, Who Proves Decisive Figure on Court.”



Should the Trump administration interact with religious leaders? It depends. New York Times' Catie Edmondson went hard against Trump’s supposed anti-Muslim (as opposed to anti-Islamic terrorism) animus in “As Trump Woos Middle Eastern Leaders, Muslim Americans Feel Scorned.” Yet the Times also criticized the Trump administration for meeting with Christians. 



The New York Times has been heavily criticized for its blatantly anti-Israeli coverage of the deadly protest in Gaza, after the terrorist group Hamas urged Palestinian civilians to rush the fence guarding Israel’s border from attack. The disparity continued on Wednesday’s front page, “Israelis Reflect: ‘I Hope at Least That Each Bullet Was Justified.’” Reporters Isabel Kershner and David Halbfinger reported from a kibbutz close to the conflict, near the “open-air prison” that they call Gaza.



Time magazine's left-leaning reasons for choosing Pope Francis its 2013 Person of the Year were apparent in the cover story written by Howard Chua-Eoan and Elizabeth Dias. Chua-Eoan and Dias trumpeted how supposedly, "in a matter of months, Francis has elevated the healing mission of the church...above the doctrinal police work so important to his recent predecessors." The two later underlined that the Pope's "vision is of a pastoral—not a doctrinaire—church."

Despite their emulation of the Norwegian Nobel Committee's reasoning for giving President Obama the Peace Prize in 2009 – to nudge along liberal "progress" and hoping that "somehow" doctrines will change – the writers grudgingly acknowledged that the Bishop of Rome doesn't sound like he will bring the change that the left hopes for:



For centuries, theological seminaries minted trained and licensed ministers of their respective religious traditions. They took seriously their creedal and confessional commitments to their respective faiths and denominations. While comparative theology may have been taught, it was with a view to understand and critically evaluate them as rival truth claims, not equally valid truthful claims. But those dark, backwards days may be behind us if Claremont School of Theology successfully paves the way.

Or at least that's the sentiment conveyed in Time magazine writer Elizabeth Dias's August 22 article, "Training Pastors, Rabbis, and Imams Together."

Dias's 10-paragraph-long August 22 article portrayed Claremont president Jerry Campbell as a "classic American" entrepreneur who took a novel approach to the school's "low enrollment and in-the-red" balance sheet: "end isolated clerical training" by "bring[ing] toegether Claremont, the Islamic Center of Southern California (ICSC) and the Academy for Jewish Religion California."

Of course, religious training deals in matters of eternal verities, not marketplace commodities, so that sort of approach is unwise, religious conservatives would argue. Yet Dias excluded any dissent from her examination into the newly inclusive Methodist seminary.