Unprofessional all around: The decision by the New York Times Sunday Book Review to publish a laudatory review of “Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America. At this point, the grievous flaws flushed out by critics on the left and right should have required that any review come with a warning label. Yet even months after criticism from outlets across the political spectrum, the Times still ran a review by Heather Boushey of Duke professor Nancy MacLean’s deceitful history of the free-market movement, Nobel-winning “public choice” economist James Buchanan, with the Koch Brothers standing in as modern-day Enemy No. 1 in the left’s fevered imaginings. The online headline: “How the Radical Right Played the Long Game and Won.”



Whatever was the matter with Kansas when Thomas Frank wrote his book is now less daunting for the left, believes New York magazine’s Eric Levitz, who contended in a Wednesday piece that the closeness of this week’s House special election in the Wichita-centric 4th District appears to spell trouble for conservatives.



After several months of New York Times angst over the supposed racist turn of the Republican Party, the front page of Monday’s New York Times featured a hostile report on a Koch brothers public relations campaign appealing to black voters, business reporter Hiroko Tabuchi’s “Koch Strategy Mixes Gospel And Oil Policy.” Beyond the “ultraconservative” labeling on the front page, Tabuchi found a left-wing environmentalist to smear as “racist” the attempt by the wealthy industrialists Charles and David Koch to convert minorities to their viewpoint on an issue.



As RNC chairman Reince Priebus appeared as a guest on Sunday's Face the Nation, CBS host John Dickerson -- using a comment from GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump about not wanting to be a "puppet" for Republican donors -- asked the RNC chairman if Republicans like Mike Pence, Scott Walker and Paul Ryan are "puppets" for the conservative Koch brothers.



Journalist Jane Mayer issued another twisted attack on her own Enemy No. 1, the libertarian industrialist Koch brothers, from her New Yorker magazine perch. “Who Sponsored The Hate?” left no doubt as to who she thinks is responsible for the current Trumpian climate of political vituperation. Mayer has for years issued dark, often conspiratorial threats about the Koch brothers, the Midwestern industrialists who are guilty of trying to convince voters of the rightness of their beliefs, to the abject horror of a big-government left which has spent a generation trying to do the same thing. She began with the now-standard liberal line that conservative ideologues are reaping what they sowed with the rise of Trump and his supporters.



While reporting on advances in cancer research on Wednesday, MSNBC host Andrea Mitchell inadvertently promoted the philanthropic work of billionaire David Koch, who along with his brother Charles, has routinely been vilified by the left-wing network for funding conservative political causes.
 



According to liberal New Yorker author Jane Mayer, half a billion dollars is only “big money” if it’s coming from the Koch brothers.

Mayer appeared on The View on March 3, 2016, to promote her latest conspiracy theory involving the Koch brothers: a new book entitled “Dark Money,” She claims to expose the Koch brothers “secret.” Their crime, according to Mayer? Wanting smaller government.



The New York Times often uses its book review to make liberal political statements under the cover of criticism, whether by praising books by liberals that bash conservatives, or eviscerating books by conservatives that attack the left. Sunday brought the first kind, summed up by this online teaser: "Dark Money argues that the Koch brothers and a small number of allied plutocrats have essentially hijacked American democracy."



During an interview with Cable News Network anchor Carol Costello on Monday, American Baptist Bishop Paul Morton -- who declined an invitation to attend a pastors' meeting with Donald Trump in New York City -- refused to assert that the GOP front-runner in the 2016 presidential race is not a Christian.

“As a Christian, as a kingdom representative, I care how you treat people,” the senior pastor of the Changing a Generation Full Gospel Baptist Church in Atlanta/Decatur, Georgia, stated.



Reduced to a daily podcast after his MSNBC show was cancelled in July, liberal Ed Schultz spent the first minute and a half of his Tuesday podcast basking in the departure of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker from the 2016 Republican field and slamming Walker as “a freaking loser” and “embarrassment” who lacks “the academic credentials or the intelligence to be president of the United States.”



Strange new respect? Two days after the New York Times labeled real estate mogul and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump a racist on its front page based on thin evidence, the Times is suddenly treating one of his Twitter pronouncements as newsworthy, with Ashley Parker devoting an entire story to Trump's tweet. Perhaps because he's attacking his fellow GOP candidates as "puppets" of the libertarian Koch Brothers, themselves a frequent target of the Times.



A movie dramatization of the Stanford prison experiment opened this weekend, but if you believe Andrew O’Hehir, that’s not the first time the 1971 psychological study has been restaged in some manner. O’Hehir asserted in a Saturday piece that over the past few decades, “the Republican Party has been the subject, willing or otherwise, of a version” of the Stanford experiment, with the result that the GOP is now “a xenophobic, all-white party of hate that seeks to roll back not just the Civil Rights movement and feminism, but the entire Enlightenment.”