Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar and Rep. Rashida Tlaib were barred from visiting Israel, and the New York Times was not pleased. An editorial on Friday had an anti-Israel slant and a whitewash of the anti-Semitic nonprofit co-sponsoring the trip, along with a helpful link to their website. Two lead stories Saturday painted Israel's move as a win for the left-wing anti-Israel movement in both countries: "Israelis concerned about the health of the relationship with the United States worried aloud on Friday that by barring members of Congress at all, let alone because of their political views, the Netanyahu government had gravely jeopardized Israel’s bipartisan support in Washington."



Former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel once said that people should “never let a serious crisis go to waste.” That philosophy is apparently shared by Wajahat Ali, a contributor to CNN and a writer for the New York Times. Ali put that concept on display Monday evening, when he responded to the weekend shootings and expressed his delight that the term “#MassacreMoscowMitch” was trending on Twitter. He added that “I still have faith in America” before he had to delete the post after many conservatives condemned it.



The New York Times reported on a controversial set of guidelines released by the American Psychological Association to “help” psychologists treating boys and men -- by discouraging “traditional masculinity.” It’s there in the headline to Jacey Fortin’s story: “Traditional Masculinity Can Hurt Boys, Say New A.P.A. Guidelines.” Fortin wrote: "They acknowledge that ideas about masculinity vary across cultures, age groups and ethnicities. But they point to common themes like “anti-femininity, achievement, eschewal of the appearance of weakness, and adventure, risk, and violence.”



For days, the liberal media have been experiencing a Chernobyl level meltdown about a Texas company releasing online instructions for 3D printing plastic weapons that actually fire real bullets. Of course, none of them did their homework and spewed inaccurate nonsense in an effort to stoke public fear of guns. After a liberal judge in Seattle blocked the release on Tuesday, the broadcast networks sang their praises with one network touting Democrats who said President Trump had blood on his hands.



On Wednesday, MSNBC’s AM Joy host and far-left charlatan Joy Reid found herself in hot water for claiming (thanks to the liberal site RawStory.com) that National Review’s David French should be ashamed of himself for penning a story excusing the prospect of nuclear war because “it will only kill Democrats and minorities.” Reid eventually offered a response that can best be referred to as milk toast, appearing to pin the blame on RawStory.com.



Last week, Wisconsin's Attorney General issued a report recommending contempt charges against six former workers at the state's now-defunct Government Accountability Board and three employees in the Milwaukee County prosecutor's office for their involvement in or knowledge of illegal and criminal leaks of GAB documents relating to what has become known as the "John Doe" investigation of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker. The Associated Press's Scott Bauer, whose animosity towards Walker and Republicans has been obvious for least seven years, has been busy downplaying the matter as just another "partisan" dispute while making false claims about the nature of the investigation and the Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling which halted it.

 



With the Las Vegas mass shooting just a couple days old, MSNBC’s Chuck Todd was eager to push the gun grabbing debate. So to satisfy his urge, he dedicated nearly all of Tuesday’s MTP Daily to talking about different proposals for gun control and hammering the National Rifle Association (NRA) for standing up for the Second Amendment. But Todd did bring on the National Review’s David French who attempted to calm the host’s hysteria.



Conservative media critics (and even some considered to be neutral) lashed out on Wednesday at BuzzFeed’s recklessly unsubstantiated report about President-elect Donald Trump as they lashed out at BuzzFeed, calling their decision a “ridiculous” one that “violated journalistic ethics.”



According to a report by Tim Cavanaugh, news editor of National Review Online, the Federal Communications Commission “has pulled the plug on its plan to conduct an intrusive probe of newsrooms” as part of a “Critical Information Needs” survey of local media markets.

FCC spokesperson Shannon Gilson issued a news release that indicated in the course of the commission's review and public comment, “concerns were raised that some of the questions may not have been appropriate. Chairman [Tom] Wheeler agreed that survey questions in the study directed toward media outlet managers, news directors, and reporters overstepped the bounds of what is required” for the pilot study in Columbia, South Carolina.



An essay posted in October by Linda Tirado entitled “Why I Make Terrible Decisions, or, Poverty Thoughts” describing her struggles as a woman with virtually no income was picked up by the liberal Huffington Post and then went viral, drawing more than four million people to read her claim that she is “a poor person,” and “that is all I am or ever will be.”

However, an investigation by Angelica Leicht for the Houston Press discovered that the blog post’s author is a private-school-educated Democratic activist who wildly exaggerated her circumstances. She owns a home as the result of her parents’ generosity, has worked in politics since 2004 and has called herself a private political consultant since 2010.



Does L.A. Times reporter Michael Hiltzik read the news?  Apparently not, since he penned one of the most lapdog press-worthy articles praising the IRS to bubble to the surface in the wake of the news that it targeted conservative Americans.  Hiltzik’s column published in the May 25 Business section labeled the targeting as “supposed,” noted that for a small budget – the IRS does a pretty “good job.”

“Showing some love after the ‘witch-hunt,” Hiltzik insinuates that the current fiasco is rather peripheral since the IRS has done such a great job collecting revenue throughout its history.  He noted that the changes made back in the Clinton administration, which shifted the agency from enforcement to a greater focus on treating the taxpayers like customers, is the epicenter of the trouble caused two administrations later. Hiltzik also lamented a that the shift away from enforcement led to a “brain drain” within the agency, and that real criminals, tax evaders, were left to operate freely. As for the bipartisan outrage over the scandal, Hiltzik wrote: