The New York Times has developed a very strange niche beat: Gather up tweets mocking a British conservative (a reliable source of mirth for the liberal media Twitterati), and then shape it into a “news” story for the enjoyment of its own liberal readership. The latest subject of mockery culled from online British “wits” was former Conservative Party British Prime Minister David Cameron, who is releasing an autobiography in a few months. Richard Perez-Pena, the paper’s London-based International News Editor, stooped to gather up mean tweets for Saturday’s “Before Book Is Published, British Mock The Author.” Stop the presses!



It's never Dear Leader's fault, is it?

For those who haven't noticed — and that would be understandable, given the national press's and broadcast outlets' consistent lack of interest in the period involved — the ongoing and worsening disaster in Syria during the past three years has caused "physical, human and political damage on an unprecedented scale." That quote comes the subheadline at Anne Applebaum's Monday column in the Washington Post. The main headline: "The disastrous nonintervention in Syria." So here was Applebaum's problem: How does one chronicle this disaster without making it look like President Barack "Lead From Behind" Obama deserves the lion's share of the blame? Her answer: Blame then-UK Prime Minister David Cameron.



An example of how unhinged press bias builds on itself was on display Sunday morning on CNN's Inside Politics.

Associated Press reporter Lisa Lerer told other panel members who were criticizing Hillary Clinton for her lack of an in-person public statement on the the results of Thursday's Brexit referendum that they should doubt the legitimacy of the result. She did so by referring to "all the great anecdotal stories on the BBC and other outlets" which found a few voters, clearly surprised by the result given pre-election polling which predicted that Remain would win, who said, in Lerer's words, "Well it was a protest vote. I didn’t think we’d leave."



In lieu of a story on the 2016 election, Saturday's CBS Evening News featured a full report promoting the United Kingdom's travel advisory for Mississippi and North Carolina in light of religious liberty laws and gushing over President Barack Obama's town hall in London that featured "an emotional statement of personal identity" from a transgender person.



Conservative Party leader David Cameron led his party to a shocking outright win in Thursday's general election in Britain. But the honeymoon is already over for Cameron, at least on the front page of the New York Times, which featured Steven Erlanger's "news analysis" of the win by the mean and "nasty party": "To Cameron, the Tory Victor, Go the Headaches."



NBC's Today show, Friday, was silent on David Cameron and the British Conservative Party sweeping to a surprise victory in Thursday's election. Perhaps the network's journalists don't want to be reminded of their botched predictions. On Sunday's Meet the Press, Chuck Todd declared the race between the Conservative Cameron and Ed Miliband, the atheist, socialist Labour Party leader, as "too close to call." Already imagining a Tory loss, Todd declared, "There's been commentary that if Cameron loses, the Republican Party ought to learn something from that." 



Barack Obama on Friday conducted an almost hour-long news conference with journalists, but faced no questions on his administration's much-maligned decision not to send a representative to Sunday's massive anti-terror rally in France. 



The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), sometimes called ISIS or IS, is a Sunni extremist group that follows al-Qaida's anti-West ideology and sees a holy war against the West as a religious duty. With regard to nonbelievers, the Quran commands, "And kill them wherever you find them, and turn them out from where they have turned you out." The Quran contains many other verses that call for Muslim violence against nonbelievers for the sake of Islamic rule.



On Tuesday's CNN Tonight, Don Lemon spotlighted the scoop that President Obama received briefings on ISIS "for at least a year" before the extreme Islamist group's blitzkrieg across northern Iraq – something the Big Three networks failed to do the same evening. During a segment with Nicholas Kristof of the New York Times, Lemon pointed out that the President was "briefed on this a year ago, and then...looked the other way – didn't take it seriously enough."

Kristof did his best to brush this reporting aside: "I don't think it's quite right to say he didn't take it seriously enough. I think that the problem there is that there aren't good options." The CNN anchor also wondered if the liberal politician should take a stronger stance against ISIS, as one of his main counterparts did: [MP3 audio available here; video below the jump]



Right now, the White House press corps is in a shouting match with the Obama Administration over the White House's refusal to allow media photographers to take pictures of various presidential events. While the left-leaning journalists are tossing around words like "propaganda" to describe the official photos which are being released, the recent trip President Obama took to South Africa for the funeral of Nelson Mandela illustrates that the media elite really isn't interested in news so much as it is in preserving its institutional power.

Perhaps the most-discussed news item out of the Mandela funeral trip was a picture that was taken of Obama, British prime minister David Cameron, and Danish prime minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt taking a “selfie” -- a self-portrait usually shot with a hand-held digital camera or camera phone -- a moment that was caught by Roberto Schmidt, a photographer for the French Press Agency. Now, Schmidt says that the overwhelming interest in the shot makes him “ashamed of mankind.”



Liberal radio talker and ex-"Crossfire" host Bill Press has awakened from his half-decade long slumber when it comes to dubious actions by the Obama administration.

The longtime Obama butt-kisser complained on his radio show yesterday that it's bad enough for Americans to learn the NSA has been eavesdropping on foreign leaders long considered allies of the US. Even worse, Press complained, is the claim that Obama was unaware of the spying, since this leads to the unavoidable conclusion that it was authorized by others without the president's consent. (Audio after the jump)



Senator John McCain had harsh words for Great Britain Friday following that country’s decision to not participate in a coordinated attack on Syria.

Appearing on NBC’s Tonight Show, McCain said, “I feel badly about the British. They're our dear friends, but they're no longer a world power. It's just a fact of life.”