On Tuesday's Fox & Friends, the hosts and CBN correspondent David Brody discussed how the Associated Press took dramatically different takes on Twitter on the budget proposals of Obama and Trump. Trump's spending plan "features soaring deficits," while Obama's spending plans were "pledging help for the  middle class" and fighting "terror threats, global warming." 



Thursday on Good Morning America, ABC journalists bitterly complained about Wednesday’s press conference with Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, where President Trump only called on Israeli outlets and conservative outlets. Despite getting hard-hitting and relevant questions, ABC’s Senior White House Correspondent Cecilia Vega whined that these weren’t “mainstream” outlets and that they didn’t ask “tough questions.” Analyst Matthew Dowd went even further with the hysteria, calling Trump’s behavior a “full frontal assault on the First Amendment.”

 


Batten down the hatches, folks. On Wednesday after the press conference between President Trump and Israel’s Benjamin Netanyahu, pure and utter panic set in on CNN as Inside Politics host John King and White House correspondent Jim Acosta bemoaned that “the fix is in” because “it would be nice, if the conservative outlets the President is calling on would ask him tough questions.”



Following President Trump’s Wednesday press conference with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, NBC News White House correspondent Kristen Welker passive aggressively savaged Christian Broadcast Network’s David Brody and Townhall editor Katie Pavlich for questions to Trump that Welker deemed not to be “tough questions” concerning Mike Flynn.



Republican members of Congress met in Philadelphia last weekend for what was called a retreat. It might have been more accurately labeled an advance. Perhaps not since the days of Franklin Roosevelt's first term has so much been done by so few that will potentially impact so many (to paraphrase Winston Churchill in a completely different context).



Last week, the Supreme Court declined to hear several Appeals Court cases on gay marriages, which resulted in bans on gay marriage being struck down in numerous states across the country. Following the Supreme Court’s decision to punt on the issue of gay marriage, Meet the Press moderator Chuck Todd saw this as a sign that social conservatism was declining and obnoxiously asked “is it time for conservatives to surrender in the culture wars?” 



NBC congressional reporter Luke Russert granted an interview to David Brody of the Christian Broadcasting Network, and agreed with Brody's suggestion that the media can bite people of faith if they wear their faith on their sleeve too obviously.

"I think that's absolutely accurate," said Russert, saying snark is valued in religion coverage alongside stereotypes: (Video and transcript below)



An article in Monday’s U.S. News & World Report by Ken Walsh, a veteran journalist who covered five presidencies, notes a growing “unhealthy antagonism … between the West Wing and the mainstream media.” If the assessment is accurate, it could mean that the press, after four years of mindless obeisance to this administration, is finally ready to provide frank coverage, warts and all.

The sea change, if one is in the cards, started with the now-infamous brouhaha involving another old hand, Bob Woodward, and White House economic adviser Gene Sperling. Since Woodward publicly asserted that he was threatened by the administration, a number of White House correspondents have come forward to affirm that the press has long been expected to show deference and go with the administration-provided narrative or keep quiet.



It's hard to imagine the media rooting, even "cheering" for a social conservative like Rick Santorum.  But two certified MSMers claim that Santorum does have the potential to attract such unlikely support.

On today's Morning Joe, Mark Halperin and John Heilemann, co-authors of the best-selling Game Change about the 2008 election, both opined that Santorum, given his appealing blue-collar background—and if he can avoid getting prickly with the press—could indeed find the media rooting for him.  Video after the jump.



In bridge, a trump card is held in reserve for winning a trick. In politics, Donald Trump is anything but reserved and appears to think he might trick enough voters to win the next presidential election.

There's plenty to draw on when critiquing a possible Trump candidacy. His multiple marriages (three) and affairs provide fodder for the media and contrast poorly with President Obama's "family values" image as husband of one wife and father of young daughters, whom he clearly loves.



Conservative Delaware Senate candidate Christine O’Donnell (R), a popular target of the mainstream media, was questioned on CNN’s “American Morning” for her statements about faith and prayer in her interview with Christian Broadcasting Network White House Correspondent David Brody. The Christian candidate cited prayer as playing a central role in her campaign, and her comments drew raised eyebrows over at CNN.

“For some people, they think this seems so arrogant, to pray to win a senate race, um, but how is it viewed in the evangelical community?” anchor Kiran Chetry asked Brody. Brody quickly responded by saying that O’Donnell isn’t praying for a victory, but rather, “God’s protection, and for, you know, people within her staff and the eyes of the voters to be open, so to speak.” Brody quickly pointed out to Chetry that the power of prayer is a mainstream concept among average Americans and that O’Donnell is being singled out because she is a political candidate.

 



Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer are "moderate" liberals.  And GOP opposition to Obama Supreme Court nominees would c