The New York Times continued to spread skepticism about the decision by a grand jury in Ferguson, Mo., not to seek criminal charges against a white police officer who shot a black teenager. The Times hypocritically upended its own liberal sensibility by suggesting more prosecutorial zeal would have been a good thing in this particular case. And a lead editorial likened the Ferguson police to "an alien, occupying force that is synonymous with state-sponsored abuse."



During his MSNBC show on Wednesday night, Ed Schultz and guest Mike Papantonio devoted five minutes to promoting, among other things, their beliefs that Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson “crafted his answers” to the grand jury and in his interview with ABC News “to match the law” and that Fox News, the tea party, and conservatives will soon want their “made-for-TV folk hero” in Wilson to run for Congress and appear on Dancing with the Stars.

Following a series of clips from Wilson’s interview with ABC’s George Stephanopoulos, Schultz welcomed in Papantonio and felt it was crucial to warn viewers that “I’m going to judge here, okay” that Wilson had “got crafted answers to match the law so he could escape justice.”



During Wednesday's edition of MSNBC's Morning Joe program, Joe Scarborough asserted that if he behaved like 18-year-old Michael Brown did during the August 9 incident in Ferguson, Mo., a police officer would have reacted the same way Darren Wilson did even though the co-host is “a white guy.”

“There are two criminal justice systems in America,” Scarborough claimed at the start of the segment. “Black young men especially are not only treated worse on the street, they're treated worse in the court system, they're treated worse all the way through. What white kids get away with, black kids don't get away with.”



Fox News anchor Sean Hannity and his guests on Thursday night slammed the New York Times for printing key details about Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson's home address. An angry Hannity attacked, "If anything happens to that man, his family, or that home...the culpability is with them." 



On Tuesday night, Cornell Brooks, president of the NAACP, appeared on CNN’s Erin Burnett OutFront to discuss the shooting death of Michael Brown and dismissed calls for violence by a member of Michael Brown’s immediate family as inciting violence. Burnett played video of Brown’s stepfather, Louis Head, telling a crowd of protestors to “burn this bi*** down” after the grand jury decided not to indict Officer Darren Wilson and asked Brooks if “that served as a call for violence?” Rather than condemn Brown’s stepfather’s highly charged rhetoric, the president of the NAACP proclaimed “I don't think that was a call for violence or it caused violence.” 



The media's coverage of the chaos that resulted after police officer Darren Wilson was not indicted for any crimes after shooting black 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., last August has drawn a tremendous demand for reporters and journalists to do a better job in such situations.

That call for people in the mainstream media to be more “fair and balanced” in their work led Dylan Byers to tweet: “How long til the 'blame the media' thing stops?” If the media reporter for the Politico website was looking for sympathy, he was sorely disappointed.



On Tuesday afternoon, MSNBC host Al Sharpton conducted a news conference with attorneys for the family of Michael Brown. Immediately following the news conference, MSNBC host Ronan Farrow expressed his outrage at the lack of charges brought against Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson for the shooting death of Michael Brown. Speaking during his Ronan Farrow Daily program, the MSNBC host proclaimed “Reverend Al Sharpton along with attorneys for Michael Brown’s family, Benjamin Crump and Anthony Gray, giving their first remarks since the incendiary announcement in Ferguson last night.”  



On Wednesday, the results of the St. Louis County autopsy of 18-year-old Michael Brown, who died after being shot by Ferguson, Missouri police officer Darren Wilson on August 9, were leaked to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch newspaper and largely supports Wilson’s claims that he had a physical altercation with Brown inside his police SUV. 

When it came to the major broadcast networks offering any mention of this big development, CBS and NBC failed to cover the story on both their morning and evening newscasts, respectively.



It looks like the Rev. Al Sharpton is taking Eric Holder's resignation pretty hard. Not only did the liberal activist praise him during Thursday's edition of the Politics Nation program as the first African-American to serve as attorney general, the host of the weekday MSNBC series called him the "best" one in history when it comes to civil rights.

In addition, the liberal activist noted in a statement that he and his civil rights organization -- the National Action Network -- "are engaged in immediate conversations with the White House on deliberations over a successor whom we hope will continue in the general direction” Holder established during his six years in office.



On Thursday morning, Thomas Jackson -- the chief of police for the city of Ferguson -- released a video in which he apologized for many things, including the death of Michael Brown, the African-American teenager who was shot and killed by white police officer Darren Wilson on August 9.

Later that day, Rev. Al Sharpton – host of the weekday afternoon PoliticsNation program on the MSNBC cable channel -- attacked the apology as “too little, too late.”



During Tuesday evening's edition of The Late Show with David Letterman on CBS, Rachel Maddow -- host of her own eponymous weeknight program on MSNBC – told the retiring host/comedian that the problems in Ferguson, Missouri, are the result of a number of intersecting conflicts.

People in the community feel “very unrepresented” in the government, she stated, which is in part due to the large disparity between the number of black citizens and local officials of the same race. Finally, Maddow claimed that Americans found it “terrifying” to see the type of military-style weaponry the small-town police department used to control demonstrators and protesters when incidents of unrest threatened to become dangerous riots.



Among the things that conservative firebreather Rush Limbaugh deservedly loathes, it's sanctimony from an ostensibly neutral news anchor.

Gwen Ifill, moderator of "Washington Week" and co-anchor of "PBS NewsHour," was among the panelists who appeared on "Meet the Press" this past Sunday. The discussion inevitably turned to the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., and the civil unrest that followed. (Audio clips after the jump)