When George Mason University announced plans to rename its law school after the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, the outrage in liberal academia (to be redundant) was unconfined. The Times followed up Wednesday, with reporter Nicholas Fandos relaying the grim news that Scalia's name would stay. Right from the lead sentence, Fandos really made the libertarian-leaning university sound like the heavy in this story, deaf to the pathetic pleas of students and faculty.



The journalists at ABC and CBS on Monday excitedly pushed the idea that the Koch brothers will politically stay on the sideline. CBS This Morning’s Nancy Cordes even spun an interview with Charles Koch as “tentative support for Hillary Clinton. Good Morning America's Jon Karl on Sunday talked to Mr. Koch about the plans he and his billionaire brother have for 2016. 



Journalist Jane Mayer issued another twisted attack on her own Enemy No. 1, the libertarian industrialist Koch brothers, from her New Yorker magazine perch. “Who Sponsored The Hate?” left no doubt as to who she thinks is responsible for the current Trumpian climate of political vituperation. Mayer has for years issued dark, often conspiratorial threats about the Koch brothers, the Midwestern industrialists who are guilty of trying to convince voters of the rightness of their beliefs, to the abject horror of a big-government left which has spent a generation trying to do the same thing. She began with the now-standard liberal line that conservative ideologues are reaping what they sowed with the rise of Trump and his supporters.



According to liberal New Yorker author Jane Mayer, half a billion dollars is only “big money” if it’s coming from the Koch brothers.

Mayer appeared on The View on March 3, 2016, to promote her latest conspiracy theory involving the Koch brothers: a new book entitled “Dark Money,” She claims to expose the Koch brothers “secret.” Their crime, according to Mayer? Wanting smaller government.



The New York Times often uses its book review to make liberal political statements under the cover of criticism, whether by praising books by liberals that bash conservatives, or eviscerating books by conservatives that attack the left. Sunday brought the first kind, summed up by this online teaser: "Dark Money argues that the Koch brothers and a small number of allied plutocrats have essentially hijacked American democracy."



During an interview with Cable News Network anchor Carol Costello on Monday, American Baptist Bishop Paul Morton -- who declined an invitation to attend a pastors' meeting with Donald Trump in New York City -- refused to assert that the GOP front-runner in the 2016 presidential race is not a Christian.

“As a Christian, as a kingdom representative, I care how you treat people,” the senior pastor of the Changing a Generation Full Gospel Baptist Church in Atlanta/Decatur, Georgia, stated.



In his new book “Good Profit,” Charles Koch said that in 2014 alone he received 153 death threats. That’s more than one every two and a half days.

Charles Koch, one of the conservative billionaire Koch brothers often maligned by the left and the news media, released his book “Good Profit” on Oct. 13. It outlines the business model he and his brother used to create and sustain Koch Industries, where Charles is CEO.



On Monday, CBS This Morning aired an exclusive interview with conservative billionaire Charles Koch and reporter Anthony Mason repeatedly played up how his money has “bought him influence, it has also bought him disdain. You’ve effectively made yourself a target.” Mason repeatedly questioned Koch’s decision to donate millions of dollars to conservative candidates and wondered “[d]o you think it's good for the political system that so much what’s called dark money is flowing into the process now?” 



Reduced to a daily podcast after his MSNBC show was cancelled in July, liberal Ed Schultz spent the first minute and a half of his Tuesday podcast basking in the departure of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker from the 2016 Republican field and slamming Walker as “a freaking loser” and “embarrassment” who lacks “the academic credentials or the intelligence to be president of the United States.”



I noted on Sunday how former Associated Press reporter Philip Elliott, writing for Time Magazine's Time.com website, joined the Scott Walker pile-on brigade criticizing the Wisconsin Governor's reasonable — arguably to a fault — position that he doesn't personally know whether Barack Obama is a Christian.

A separate post by Elliott, which covered a weekend retreat hosted by Charles Koch, originally carried a headline so obviously outrageous that it should never have gotten past him (though, to be fair, he may not have been responsible for creating it) or Time's editors (if they exist) for more than a few minutes after it appeared. Readers will see that headline after the jump (HT Mary Katharine Ham at Hot Air):



Strange new respect? Two days after the New York Times labeled real estate mogul and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump a racist on its front page based on thin evidence, the Times is suddenly treating one of his Twitter pronouncements as newsworthy, with Ashley Parker devoting an entire story to Trump's tweet. Perhaps because he's attacking his fellow GOP candidates as "puppets" of the libertarian Koch Brothers, themselves a frequent target of the Times.



A movie dramatization of the Stanford prison experiment opened this weekend, but if you believe Andrew O’Hehir, that’s not the first time the 1971 psychological study has been restaged in some manner. O’Hehir asserted in a Saturday piece that over the past few decades, “the Republican Party has been the subject, willing or otherwise, of a version” of the Stanford experiment, with the result that the GOP is now “a xenophobic, all-white party of hate that seeks to roll back not just the Civil Rights movement and feminism, but the entire Enlightenment.”