As if we don’t see 2020 presidential candidate Bernie Sanders often enough, a comic book company has decided to produce a one-shot singing the praises of the Independent Vermont senator with the curious title Talk Bernie to Me! The issue will feature three covers, with one of Sanders’ smiling face, another with him as He-Man from the Masters of the Universe animated series holding up a sword in front of the White House and a third depicting his arrest during a protest many years ago.



On All In Tuesday night, the conversation turned to recent reports that the right-leaning Koch brothers were considering supporting candidates outside the Republican party. Commentary soon drifted, however, into outright criticism of the prominent libertarian donors. Apparently, Charles and David Koch don’t want to pay taxes. 
 



The New York Times loves its public transit and dislikes the limited-government Koch Brothers. Combine those trends and you have: “Kochs Finance High-Tech War Against Transit – Targeting Voter Data to Kill Buses and Rail” in Tuesday’s off-lead story slot. Not “War Against Federal Over-Spending...” the Kochs are apparently against people moving around. Climate reporter Hiroko Tabuchi sounded mildly alarmed throughout the long feature, following anti-public transit canvassers in Nashville.



The GOP-passed tax legislation passed in late 2017, remains a centerpiece of the 2018 mid-term elections. One side will be praising it, the other attacking it. USA Today only seems to care about who backs one side of that battle.

Advertisements celebrating or attacking the tax bill were the focus of an April 17, USA Today front-page exclusive. It reported that “GOP groups and candidates have run nearly 17,800 spots this year that tout tax reform ... the barrage has forced Democrats to retaliate with commercials that slam the tax cuts as helping the wealthy — and endangering Medicare and Social Security in the years ahead.”



In Friday’s New York Times, reporter Nicholas Fandos used the firing by President Trump of Veterans Affairs secretary David Shulkin to spread irrational fear of privatization at the scandal and corruption-plagued federal organization for veterans assistance: “V.A. Shake-Up Gives Rise to New Fears of Privatized Care.”



On Sunday morning's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, during the "Gotcha" segment, host Al Sharpton lamely compared himself to James Bond as he likened conservative donors Charles and David Koch to Bond-type "villains" because of their support for conservative causes.

 



Unprofessional all around: The decision by the New York Times Sunday Book Review to publish a laudatory review of “Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America. At this point, the grievous flaws flushed out by critics on the left and right should have required that any review come with a warning label. Yet even months after criticism from outlets across the political spectrum, the Times still ran a review by Heather Boushey of Duke professor Nancy MacLean’s deceitful history of the free-market movement, Nobel-winning “public choice” economist James Buchanan, with the Koch Brothers standing in as modern-day Enemy No. 1 in the left’s fevered imaginings. The online headline: “How the Radical Right Played the Long Game and Won.”



Whatever was the matter with Kansas when Thomas Frank wrote his book is now less daunting for the left, believes New York magazine’s Eric Levitz, who contended in a Wednesday piece that the closeness of this week’s House special election in the Wichita-centric 4th District appears to spell trouble for conservatives.



After several months of New York Times angst over the supposed racist turn of the Republican Party, the front page of Monday’s New York Times featured a hostile report on a Koch brothers public relations campaign appealing to black voters, business reporter Hiroko Tabuchi’s “Koch Strategy Mixes Gospel And Oil Policy.” Beyond the “ultraconservative” labeling on the front page, Tabuchi found a left-wing environmentalist to smear as “racist” the attempt by the wealthy industrialists Charles and David Koch to convert minorities to their viewpoint on an issue.



Whatever it takes. Wednesday’s New York Times saw the paper defending the incompetent Veterans Administration and praising “biblical imperatives,” all in the name of opposing Donald Trump. In “Harsh Critic of the V.A. May Become Its Leader,” by Dave Philipps, who often reports on the military for the paper. Became a fierce defender of the corrupt and incompetent federal agency and picked the odd target of Rep. Jeff Miller, considered by Trump to run the agency. The same day, religion reporter Laurie Goodstein took the biblical views of Catholic bishops seriously -- at least when they were criticizing Trump and calling for amnesty for illegals, two of the paper’s favorite hobbies.



As RNC chairman Reince Priebus appeared as a guest on Sunday's Face the Nation, CBS host John Dickerson -- using a comment from GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump about not wanting to be a "puppet" for Republican donors -- asked the RNC chairman if Republicans like Mike Pence, Scott Walker and Paul Ryan are "puppets" for the conservative Koch brothers.



When George Mason University announced plans to rename its law school after the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, the outrage in liberal academia (to be redundant) was unconfined. The Times followed up Wednesday, with reporter Nicholas Fandos relaying the grim news that Scalia's name would stay. Right from the lead sentence, Fandos really made the libertarian-leaning university sound like the heavy in this story, deaf to the pathetic pleas of students and faculty.