It’s been more than a week since gunman Stephen Paddock killed 59 people and wounded more than 500 others attending the Route 91 Harvest country music festival in the Las Vegas strip on Sunday, October 1, but liberals are still trying to use this tragedy to push for stricter gun-control laws. Joining the fray on the Sunday edition of Fareed Zakaria GPS (Global Public Square) on the Cable News Network, the host called for laws to be enacted to restrict gun possession apparently without knowing that those laws are already on the books.



A Vienna-based magazine that calls itself Vangardist -- and a “progressive men’s magazine” -- is seeking to renew interest in the rise of HIV and AIDS around the world this week by printing a select number of magazine covers using ink infused with HIV-infected blood.

The 3,000 copies of the publication's special edition also features stories of "HIV heroes" at a time when the editors say too many people have grown complacent about the disease.



While liberals always hate to “let a good tragedy go to waste,” Joan Walsh – editor at large of Salon magazine – might have set a new record for implementing that strategy just hours after Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan died on Thursday.

“It’s probably no accident,” she declared, that the Liberian's passing “happened in [governor] Rick Perry’s Texas. More than 1.5 million Texans, with a median income of $833, are going uninsured because Perry rejected Medicaid funding” when he and his administration turned down participation in the ObamaCare program.



Just hours before the Senate voted to approve a measure that was passed by the House on Wednesday in a 425-0 vote to restore the death benefits paid to the families of fallen soldiers, liberal radio talk show host Bill Press showed his true colors when he said it would be a “big mistake” for the government to do that because “once the government starts making special exceptions, it allows the shutdown to continue.”

In a stumble similar to one Senate majority leader Harry Reid made last week, when the Nevada Democrat accused CNN reporter Dana Bash of being “irresponsible” and “reckless” for asking if he would help “one child who has cancer” and is receiving treatment through the NIH, Press stated: “When you shut down the government, a lot of great things are not going to get done, and why should we make an exception for those that just happen to pop up and get a lot of media attention?”