Liberal TV loves to bash Christianity any opportunity it gets and Monday night’s episode of TBS’s People of Earth did not disappoint. The episode, titled “Gerry’s Return,” portrayed the relationship between a married woman and a priest that became sexual at the end of last season. One of the opening scenes of the episode had Chelsea (Tracee Chimo) enter the confessional to tell Father Doug (Oscar Nuñez) that she misses him. She flirts with him through the screen, saying she’s having “impure thoughts.” The two plan a rendezvous before Father Doug tells her to “Go in peace, my child” and “make reservations.


NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday followed the lead of the New York Times and boosted a recent article published by an ally of Pope Francis that targeted "ultra-conservative" Catholics for forming a so-called "alliance of hate with evangelicals." Host Lulu Garcia Navarro turned to Joshua McElwee of the National Catholic Reporter for his analysis of the article, but failed to mention his publication's heterodox/left-wing stances on many Church issues. McElwee contended that these "right-wing" Catholics are "operating in the exact opposite way of the Pope — which, for a Catholic, is obviously a very strange thing."


The media sported their real colors again as Cardinal George Pell was summoned to court in Melbourne, Australia, without knowing what the charges are or who the accusers are. But The New York Times fulminated anyway about how this will "test the credibility" of Pope Francis in dealing with sex-abuse allegations against the Catholic Church. To say that the pope's credibility is on the line is to suggest that he should act now to discipline a man who is presumed innocent. The contempt for civil liberties could not be more clear.


NPR blatantly slanted a story against a Catholic bishop in Illinois who recently instructed his priests to deny the Eucharist, last rites, and funerals decree with quotes from four activists who dissent against the Catholic Church's teachings on sexuality. While the article included excerpts from the cleric's document, as well as from a statement from his diocese, they failed to interview anyone conservative or orthodox to provide more balance to the four dissenters.


TBS's Samantha Bee unleashed against her longstanding nemesis, the Catholic Church, during a segment on Wednesday's Full Frontal. Bee zeroed on the Church's opposition to a proposed "child victims act," and contended that "if you're an institution that has hurt so many children that paying out civil settlements would make you go bankrupt, maybe you should?" The left-wing "comedian" added, "Anyway, it's fine. It won't. You're sitting on more treasure than Smaug the Dragon [a character in "The Hobbit"], so pay up."


Season two of the 1970s cartoon, F is for Family, was released Tuesday, May 30 on Netflix and, while it had its funny moments and nostalgic memories, especially for this child of the '70s, it also had plenty of horrifically offensive moments for Christians. Created by Michael Price (The Simpsons) and comedian Bill Burr and produced by actors Vince Vaughn and Peter Billingsley (Ralphie in A Christmas Story), the series centers around the animated Murphy family, headed by parents Frank (voiced by Bill Burr) and Sue (Laura Dern).

Showtime’s new comedy I’m Dying Up Here premiered on Sunday, June 4. The show, produced by Jim Carrey, centers around a group of up and coming comics trying to become successful in the 1970s. Right off the bat, the show dove into the controversial topic of abortion, with the comic applauding the legalization of abortion. He encourages all the men to cheer, saying, "That's a big win for us, too."


“Between Donald Trump and anything resembling Christianity,” there is only a great void -- a “vast, empty, and dark space,” declared gay Catholic pundit Sullivan in a Friday column for New York magazine. Sullivan described Trump as “neither religious nor irreligious. He is pre-religious. He is a pagan. He makes much more sense as a character in Game of Thrones, a medieval world bereft of the legacy of Jesus of Nazareth, than as a president of a modern, Western country...I will never understand how more than half of white Catholics could vote for such a man, or how the leadership of the church could be so terribly silent when such a monster stalks the earth.”


This week ABC’s The Real O’Neals focused on the often-overlooked Catholic sacrament of Confirmation. As Kenny (Noah Galvin) states, it’s an act that “strengthens our bond with the Church.” Sounds like a nice little episode, right? Nope! That connection with the Church apparently extends to seeing God as whatever you want, even a woman. Yeah, nobody shows the bond to Catholic Church stronger than The Real O’Neals.


The last, and probably the least, episode of HBO’s The Young Pope aired February 13 and nicely tied together the anti-Catholic theme with liberal arrogance. In the third episode of the show, the Pope (Jude Law) declared, “I believe only in myself.” His words ring true again in the season finale. 


The ninth episode of HBO’s The Young Pope, which aired February 12, featured an anti-Catholic view of abortion, a conversation about orgasms, and (surprise!) another corrupt, lecherous clergy member.


The group called SNAP – the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests – disparaged Pope Francis meeting with victims on his American trip as an empty public-relations gesture, a dodge. On CNN, SNAP spokesman Manny Vega demanded that if the pope “wants to put an end to this, he has to be completely transparent, allow the names to go unredacted, allow the files -- allow researchers to get into the Vatican files and take a look at everything that's happened. There has to be complete disclosure.”

But CNN and the other television networks haven’t touched the amazing story of the shoe going on the other foot in the last few weeks. Suddenly, SNAP is falling apart after a lawsuit alleging they were funded largely by kickbacks for contingency-fee attorneys extracting billions of dollars in settlements.