Former senator and vice president Joe Biden is officially running for president, and once again went to Anita Hill in its front-page story Friday, “Biden’s ‘Regret’ For Hill’s Pain Fails to Soothe.” Hill is seen by the press as a victim of both Clarence Thomas and the all-white, all-male Senate Judiciary Committee. She made regular appearances in the paper during the Brett Kavanaugh hearings, and been given a fresh life with Biden’s presidential announcement: "....Ms. Hill says the call from Mr. Biden left her feeling deeply unsatisfied."



Despite the fact that CNN has covered the latest anti-Semitism from Congresswoman Ilhan Omar (D-MN) throughout the day on Monday, numerous analysts and hosts have tried to assist Omar by muddying the waters, suggesting House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) is also anti-Semitic for a tweet last year criticizing the left-wing views of Michael Bloomberg, George Soros, and Tom Steyer.



New York Times congressional reporter Carl Hulse, always eager for signs of Republican trouble, gleefully piled on to the Kavanaugh scrum with “Resume Glittered, but the Reality Was Something Else Again” in Wednesday’s edition. Not to be outdone, Sydney Ember filed a fan letter in the guise of an interview with “fiery” Democratic Sen. Mazie Hirono of Hawaii, infamous for saying Kavanaugh’s conservative approach to the Constitution made his rape denial less believable: “‘I Believe  Her’: Mazie Hirono Takes an Aggressive Stance in Kavanaugh Hearings.”



New York Times congressional reporter Carl Hulse once again rationalized and trumpeted childish and undignified Democratic tactics during Senate Judiciary hearings, in the party’s cynical yet (so far) failed attempt to derail Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court. Hulse on Saturday celebrated the Democrats showing their voters "that they would not be bulldozed by Republicans."



As the Supreme Court confirmation process for Trump nominee Brett Kavanaugh descends into Democratic-inspired pandemonium, New York Times congressional reporter Carl Hulse skipped the Democratic-inspired partisanship of previous Supreme Court hearings in two pieces for the New York Times, while reporter Sheryl Gay Stolberg pondered if Kavanaugh was a threat to women's rights.



Now that Donald Trump seems ready to name another conservative to the Supreme Court, to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy, the Times suddenly realizes the Court is “polarized” and politicized, and pleads for a court free from ideology. This after years of pushing to discover abortion, gay rights, and universal health care in the “terse, old” document. Chief Washington correspondent Carl Hulse lamented on Friday that “Political Polarization Takes Hold of the Supreme Court.” The text box: “A reputation for independence has faded, even before a new justice’s arrival.”



The infamously Democrat-friendly New York Times congressional reporter Carl Hulse visited retired Sen. Harry Reid for a friendly debriefing. Hulse let the deeply partisan Reid conveniently lay in against his former Republican colleagues and President Trump, with no opposition, in “Senator’s Farewell: ‘I Just Shake My Head.'”



NYT reporter Carl Hulse managed to find good news for Democrats in the party’s abject surrender on the government-shutdown front, in his “news analysis” for Tuesday’s front page, “Hope for Bargain in a Swift Surrender.” The jump-page headline: “With Swift Surrender, Democrats Hold Hope Of Reaching a Bargain.”



The New York Times is still trying to spin the congressional sex scandals in the Democrats’ direction, as demonstrated in three stories Friday virtually bragging that their stand on Franken will put them on the “unassailable” “high ground” for Campaign 2018. The paper frantically spun for the party of Bill Clinton on a day when a presidential hopeful for 2020 was resigning in disgrace: "Democrats appear determined to grab the moral high ground in an environment in which they hope sexual harassment becomes a wedge issue in the 2018 midterm elections – even if it costs them popular colleagues and political icons."



The media-friendly spectacle of retiring Arizona Republican Senator Jeff Flake taking to the Senate floor to denounce Trump unleashed a predictable chorus of reportorial hosannas, including two front-page stories and a full-story excerpt from Flake's speech in Wednesday’s New York Times. Also on the Times' front page, congressional reporter Carl Hulse eagerly took up a search for more anti-Trump dissenters in his column, “Newfangled Freedom Caucus: Will There Be a Fifth Member?”



New York Times congressional reporter Carl Hulse, who now writes the paper’s “On Washington” column, made the front page Thursday with a tribute to his favorite kind of Republican -- a moderate currently making life difficult for conservatives: “A Swing Vote From Alaska Isn’t Swayed.” Profile of moderate Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski. Hulse’s favorite kind of story of all is cheering on Democrats who batter Republicans, but he clearly enjoyed this take as well.



When Washington, D.C. woke up Sunday morning, politicos were greeted with the news that Attorney General Jeff Sessions was going to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee. It would be a change of plans since Sessions was scheduled for a public hearing in front of the Senate Budget Committee, where he was expected to be pelted with Russia questions. It’s the Intelligence Committee that is handling the Senate’s Russia investigation, but according to CNN’s John King on Inside Politics, a private hearing could be an “obstruction of justice.”