Taking a left-wing angle on “climate change,” New York Times reporter Yamiche Alcindor swerved into radical racial ideas on black victims of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. Alcindor reported from Galveston, Texas, “In Sweltering South, Climate Change Is Workplace Hazard.” The text itself had a more provocative racial activist tone, with unchallenged allegations of racism around Hurricane Katrina and the Trump administration, and a shout-out to Black Lives Matter.


Airing on June 25, the 2017 BET Awards were hosted by comedienne Leslie Jones and mostly featured live musical performances. Otherwise, the focus of the awards was a message of encouraging Black Lives Matter social justice warriors, although, without the long preachy political sermons delivered in many other awards shows. References to people killed in police-involved shootings - including the acquittal last week of the officer who shot Philando Castile - were present throughout.


The season finale of Fox’s race-baiting drama, Shots Fired, “Hour 10: Last Dance,” continued with its black=good, white=bad theme as it ended with this conclusion: it’s always about race. Wednesday night’s resolution was completely predictable. The black police officer, who was justified in killing unarmed white teenager Jesse Carr, is indicted. But there is no indictment for the wealthy white man who killed unarmed black teenager Joey Campbell.


Wednesday night's episode of Fox's Shots Fired, "Hour 9: Come to Jesus," continued to build on its storyline in which wealthy white donors are furnished with guns and tasers – as part of the "Tours" program—and take part in ride-alongs with racist police in the fictional town of Gate Station, North Carolina. To recap, a wealthy white donor executed black teenager Joey Campbell while he was helpless, on the ground, and crying for his mother. What else would you expect from a wealthy white man armed with a gun? In tonight's episode, we learn that the wealthy white donor – who also happens to be building a private prison (classic!) – thought he was taking out his taser, intending only to stun the boy. Instead, he slaughters the poor youth.


The controversial Netflix series Dear White People was finally released on Friday, April 28, and let me tell you, the "dear" in the title is NOT a term of endearment. In fact, to quote one of the show's writers, F*** White People would probably have been more appropriate, with cops and Republicans being singled out for particular hatred.


Wednesday night’s episode of Shots Fired, “Hour 5: Before the Storm,” officially established the show as over-the-top, race-baiting nonsense. While DOJ Special Prosecutor Preston Terry (Stephen James) and Investigator Ashe Akino (Sanaa Lathan) delve deeper into their investigation of the deaths of black, unarmed teen Joey Campbell and white, unarmed teen Jesse Carr, their discovery about the white, racist police department out to get black people takes an inexplicable turn. Akino pieces together that rich, white people are hunting poor, black people for sport. Literally.


Friday night’s episode of CBS’s Blue Bloods, “Love Lost,” took a turn for the worse in promoting assisted suicide, but also showed the true dedication officers have for everyone in their communities, regardless of race.


The pilot episode of FOX’s new, racially charged show, Shots Fired, fans the flames of anti-police sentiment with its depiction of the Black Lives Matter world where black people are disproportionately mistreated by police and the police force is run by corrupt white men.


New York Times arts reporter Randy Kennedy covered the controversy over the audacity of a white artist exhibiting a painting at the Whitney Biennial, based on photographs of the body of Emmett Till, the teenager murdered in Mississippi in 1955: “Painting of Emmett Till Draws Protests -- A white artist’s work at the Whitney Biennial has some calling for its removal.” Strikingly, the article, from a purportedly pro-free-speech media organization, included not a single word of dissent about the idea of leftist protesters wanting to have a piece of art not only removed from an exhibit, which would be awful enough, but destroyed. No one came to the defense of free expression in the face of a frankly racist attempt to suppress and destroy art based on the skin color of the artist


After starting off the season failing at mocking police for brutality and later gun owners, CBS’s Superior Donuts really shouldn’t be discussing any more topics to do with the police. Or race. Yet here we are with an episode on both and so much more. Let’s get started because this one is a doozy.


Back in May, Juju Chang of ABC’s 20/20 revisited the case of Daniel Holtzclaw, a former Oklahoma City police officer, convicted in 2015 of 18 counts of sexual assault-related crimes. Holtzclaw’s alleged victims were eight black women and, as the investigation unfolded in the 2014 “summer of Ferguson,” his case became a focus of the Black Lives Matter movement and racial turmoil in general. Indeed, Holtzclaw’s televised tears as his verdict was read were greeted with triumphant spite from the left. Holtzclaw always maintained his innocence and has filed an appeal.


On a very special Black Lives Matter episode of Freeform’s Switched at Birth, the show switches its focus from its main white and Latino characters to feature the stories of 3 black students at University of Missouri – Kansas City. It's about as preachy, melodramatic, and self-important as you'd expect, but it really strains credulity with an unintentionally comedic lecture on media bias.