Late Monday night, Fox News @ Night host and Supreme Court correspondent Shannon Bream tweeted that she had to flee her live shot from outside the Supreme Court after having “felt threatened” by the “very volatile” “mood” by the far-left protesters having conniptions over President Trump’s nomination of Brett Kavanaugh for the nation’s high Court. 



The political highlight Tuesday was the joint hearing of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce Committees where Senators grilled Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg about his company’s conduct for hours. Of course, a focus for three major liberal news networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) was the probing questions regarding the information allegedly used in the 2016 election. But they ignored questions by Senators Ted Cruz (R-TX) and Ben Sasse (R-NE) regarding liberal bias and censorship of conservatives.



Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg grappled with questions of all stripes at Tuesday’s Senate hearing on the social media platform and the 2016 election, but it was Nebraska Republican Senator Ben Sasse’s questions about hate speech that should alarm free speech advocates. Along with inquiries from Texas Republican Ted Cruz, Sasse stood out.



Salon's Marcotte has some advice for Ben Sasse: There's no future in being the respectable face of the Party of Deplorables. In a Wednesday piece, Marcotte pooh-poohed the idea that it might be worth Sasse's while to primary President Trump in 2020. She did so partly because the Nebraska senator is "less than worthless" as an anti-Trumper, partly because Sasse's image as "a man of courage and integrity" is "utter malarkey," but mostly because new-school Republicans like unadorned cruelty and ignorance, and Sasse won't quite go there.



Celebrating life and protecting the “little guy” should be a bipartisan goal, according to one senator. Speaking at Students for Life of America #SockIt2PP rally Wednesday, Sen. Ben Sasse (R-NE)  affirmed the human dignity of the unborn as Congress considers defunding Planned Parenthood in debates over the upcoming federal budget.



Reporter Jonathan Weisman looked very hard to find hypocrisy among Tea Party candidates in his Saturday New York Times story "Ivy League Degrees, Elite Consulting Jobs, and Now Tea Party Candidacies."

The online subhead hinted at it: "Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Tom Cotton of Arkansas are running for the Senate as common-man conservatives but share high-flying pedigrees." Weisman's article is sprinkled with "gotcha" attempts that don't stick:



"Faith first, government second for GOP candidate," blares a teaser headline on MSNBC.com. They say that like it's a bad thing.

Of course, to MSNBC it is, when religious freedom objections stand opposed to ObamaCare, so MSNBC.com writer Morgan Whitaker sought to explain to Lean Forward partisans all the ways that Ben Sasse is supposedly a danger to civil society, including a ludicrous suggestion that his views could allow for establishment of Sharia law (excerpt below; emphasis mine):