Emily Bazelon is a staff writer for the New York Times Sunday Magazine, but she was lead author of the earth-shattering story that Brett Kavanaugh apparently threw ice during an altercation at a bar in New Haven, Conn. in 1985. The online headline that appeared Monday evening was explicit: “Kavanaugh Was Questioned by Police After Bar Fight in 1985.” Bazelon is also a fellow at Yale Law School, Kavanaugh’s alma mater, and upon his nomination she made clear her contempt. So why is Bazelon reporting on this "story"?



The front page of Thursday’s New York Times featured more sliming of youthful Kavanaugh as a drunk in “An Emerging Portrait of a Student ‘Frequently Unusually Drunk.’” The text box: “Ex-Classmates of Judge Recall Hard Partying.” The jump-page headline snuck in a slimy adjective: “Worrisome Portrait Emerges of a Student ‘Frequently Unusually Drunk.” Thursday’s front page also featured the headline “Kavanaugh in Jeopardy As Accusations Multiply Before Senate Face-Off." The paper's focus has certainly shifted rather far afield from the unsubstantiated charges of sexual assault leveled by Christine Blasey Ford.



The front page of Wednesday’s New York Times swallowed whole Democratic talking points in the fast-moving barrage of allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. The paper is moving on from the original accusation of sexual assault by Christine Blasey Ford and is now moving on to paranoid guilt by association, having fully embraced the shoddy New Yorker story regarding his latest accuser, Deborah Ramirez:  “Outsider Faced Culture of Privilege and Alcohol" failed to question Ramirez’s vague accusations.



The New York Times is trying its best to find dirt on President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, filing an odd public information request with his wife’s employer. And in 2005 they tried to access sealed private records involving then-Bush-nominee John Roberts. Even the paper's commenters weren't convinced of the paper's fairness and balance, wondering where that investigative zeal was when it came to Democratic Supreme Court nominees..



About a month ago, I joked in a column published elsewhere that the reason a certain New York Times column didn't resonate with anyone is because no one pays attention to the Old Gray Lady any more.

Unfortunately, that's not true. But the fact that almost no other establishment press outlet has mentioned the paper's disclosure late Wednesday (appearing in Thursday's print edition) that former MF Global CEO Jon Corzine and others at the bankrupt firm likely won't face criminal prosecution in the firm's crack-up, which featured raiding individual customers' accounts to the tune of $1.6 billion, seems to indicate that the Times has become a favored holding cell for stories detrimental to Democrats which will otherwise be ignored. Oh, and contrary to the belief expressed in a very long Vanity Fair item in February, when Corzine was seen to be in "a scandal he can’t survive," and that "his career is likely finished," the man is seriously considering starting up a new hedge fund.



Has the New York Times Business section gone soft on former New Jersey Democratic Gov. Jon Corzine, now under the scandal spotlight for his service as chief executive of the failed financial services firm MF Global?

Saturday's Business Day story by Azam Ahmed and Ben Protess buried intriguing details that reflect suspiciously on Corzine under the bland headline, "Congressional Memo Sheds New Light on MF Global." The paper didn't even identify the scandal-plagued former governor as a Democrat.