On Monday the Bechtel Corporation announced it was pulling up stakes from Frederick, Md., and moving a "substantial" portion of its Maryland-based jobs across the Potomac to Reston, Virginia. Of course the Washington Post, which on Monday endorsed Maryland Democratic gubernatorial nominee Anthony Brown, refused to carry the story in its print pages. High taxes and a sluggish economy that is failing to compete with neighboring states are among the top issues in the campaign.



On page A3 of today's Washington Post, staffer Reid Wilson relayed the story of how "Voter discontent opens up more governor's races" in a reliably Obama-friendly corridor of the continental United States. "GOP offers surprising challenges in Northeast," notes the subheader for the story.



Deeply liberal Maryland -- where they tax, I kid you not, the rain -- has announced a tax revenue shortfall of $405 million. This news arrives in the middle of a gubernatorial election year and following years of tax hikes and casino openings which the state's Democratic establishment promised would solve the state's fiscal woes. 

So naturally the Washington Post shielded Democratic gubernatorial nominee Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown by burying the development at the bottom of page B3 of Thursday's Metro section in a story headlined, "Tax revenue forecasts are cut by $405 million."



Last year the deeply liberal Democratic state of Maryland had an absolutely atrocious rollout of its ObamaCare website. Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown (D), who is running this November for governor, was in charge of the ObamaCare rollout.

The website has since been completely overhauled, at the staggering cost of $40 million, but all the same, health department officials are planning "to limit access... so that any glitches can be worked out and the system won't be overwhelmed with requests," Jenna Johnson of the Washington Post reported today. Editors buried the story on page B5.



In yet another instance of the Washington Post shielding the Maryland Democratic political establishment, including the party's nominee for governor, editors buried on page B4 of the Saturday, August 30 edition a stunning story about outgoing Gov. Martin O'Malley's refusal to cooperate with federal immigration officials to eventually deport illegal immigrants who have served time behind bars.

"Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley has instructed a state-run jail in Baltimore to stop honoring federal requests to detain inmates beyond their scheduled release dates in order to explore potential immigration violations, unless there is probable cause that those who are being held have broken the law," staff writer John Wagner noted in the lead paragraph for his article headlined "O’Malley tells jail to curtail immigrant detentions."



The Washington Post is almost certain to endorse liberal Democrat Anthony Brown for Maryland governor. So it's really no surprise that the paper's news reporters and editors have taken an incredibly light touch when it comes to the lieutenant governor's political liabilities. Chief among them is the disastrous rollout of the state's ObamaCare exchange, which, as I've previously noted, the paper has been careful to report in such a way that downplays Brown's responsibility as outgoing Gov. Martin O'Malley's ObamaCare implementation point man.

The Post turned once again to that template today in Jenna Johnson and Mary Pat Flaherty's below-the-fold Metro front-pager, "Auditors seek data tied to Md. exchange launch." "GOP's Harris, who urged probe, says subpoenas were issued as result," added the subheader. Johnson and Flaherty waited until the 14th paragraph in their 17-paragraph story to note Republican criticism of Brown, and quickly followed that up with a boiler-plate response from a Brown flack:



The Washington Post is at it again in today's Metro section, boosting Gov. Martin O'Malley's protege Anthony Brown, this time by smearing conservative Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan.

Staff writer John Wagner essentially allowed his 32-paragraph article, "Hogan emphasizes pocketbook issues," to function as a platform for the state's Democratic Party to rehash their tired "war on women" meme. "Foes want to focus on hopeful's social views, saying they're extreme" noted the subhead to Wagner's piece. Sure enough, Wagner focused almost exclusively on the complaints of those foes rather than on economic issues of import to Marylanders:



Yesterday Accokeek, Md.-based firearms manufacturer Beretta USA announced that it would shut down its plant in Maryland and move all manufacturing operations to Gallatin, Tennessee. Beretta cited the state's hostile anti-gun politics as a reason for the move, although the Italian company will keep its white-collar executive jobs in the Old Line State.

This is a gubernatorial election year in Maryland and the Washington Post-endorsed Democratic nominee for governor, Anthony Brown, lives in Prince George's County, which will lose 160 jobs thanks to the plant's relocation. So surely the Post's coverage of the move included some attention to Mr. Brown and his thoughts on the matter, right? Not a chance. Nowhere in Michael Rosenwald's 12-paragraph page B3 story -- yup, it was buried three pages deep in the Metro section -- was either Brown or Republican gubernatorial nominee Larry Hogan asked for comment.



The Washington Post's Jenna Johnson reported yet another black mark against Maryland's rollout of ObamaCare. It seems the "board that oversees Maryland's troubled health insurance marketplace repeatedly violated a state law that requires such groups to fully explain their reasons for meeting behind closed doors" according to a ruling issued Tuesday by the Maryland Open Meetings Compliance Board.

Although the Washington Post's endorsee for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, was tasked by Gov. Martin O'Malley as his personal point man for the ObamaCare rollout, Brown's name came up a grand total of, wait for it, ZERO times in Johnson's 21-paragraph story. What's more, Johnson's story, while given front-page space on page B1 of the May 22 edition, was slapped with a boring headline that all but discouraged readers to review the story, "Closed sessions broke Md. law." By contrast, on Sunday, staff writer John Wagner treated Brown to a puffy profile in a Metro section front-pager "The Value of Service."



The ObamaCare health care exchange website that Maryland designed is such a monstrous failure that the state government is pulling its plug tomorrow and replacing it with a website which essentially mimics the architecture of the actually-functional Connecticut state exchange. In the process, Maryland taxpayers have seen $125.5 million of their hard-earned tax dollars flushed down the drain by 2016 president hopeful Gov. Martin O'Malley (D) and his protege, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, whom O'Malley tapped as his ObamaCare point man, and who is pursuing the Democratic nomination for governor this June.

Curiously neither politician was scrutinized in Jenna Johnson and Mary Pat Flaherty's March 31 Metro section front-pager "Md. to rebuild sit from scratch," and there was only a passing reference to them in an earlier story over the weekend by the same reporters.



You could call it bias-by-boring-headline. This typically happens when liberal Democrats do something scandalous or at the very least questionable and a major newspaper covers the story and publishes it, but headline editors give it such a milquetoast headline as to essentially tell the reader,"You'll fall asleep reading this. Move along."

That's essentially the case with the Washington Post's headline* this morning for a story about how Democratic state legislators in Maryland are circling the wagons to protect 2014 gubernatorial front-runner Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown (D) from a steady stream of bad ObamaCare-related news which could sink his chances for the Democratic nomination and/or the governor's office in November.