It’s always refreshing when an actor decides to say what he thinks about American politics – especially when that actor is British. Not.

 



As Hollywood advertises assisted-suicide film and shows, one new film is standing out by showing life is worth living even when it’s not perfect. The upcoming film, Breathe, stars Andrew Garfield as British disability-rights advocate Robin Cavendish.



Actor Andrew Garfield, who after two films was dumped from his role as Spider-Man, lamented on Monday how broadly the films were promoted, sneering that he had to appeal to American "bigots." He complained of Sony's marketing for the comic book movies: "The pressure to get it right, to please everyone… it's not going to happen." 



Gavia Baker-Whitelaw lamented how the movie depictions of Spider-Man and other superheroes are all "straight, white men" in a Tuesday item on Salon.com titled "America deserves better superheroes: Why a straight, white Spider-Man is no longer a real underdog." Baker-Whitelaw, a "fandom and Internet culture" reporter for the website The Daily Dot, zeroed in on the supposed "ramifications of having eternal underdog Peter Parker remain a straight, white man."

The writer also complimented Andrew Garfield, the actor who plays the title character in The Amazing Spider-Man 2, for wondering why the superhero "can't...be into boys," and contended that Sony, the studio releasing the upcoming movie, "might benefit from listening to...Garfield's comments on the potential hypocrisy of portraying Peter Parker as being marginalized by society." She later hoped that superhero movies would catch up with the "reasonably progressive and diverse representation of real-life America" in present-day comic books: