After House Majority Whip Rep. Steve Scalise, of LA. was shot gunman opened fire at a GOP baseball practice in Alexandria, VA., celebrities were more concerned with the politics of gun control than the fact that a U.S. congressman was shot. Mia Farrow, previous wife of Frank Sinatra and star in The Great Gatsby (1974), tweeted:



Minutes after Representative Steve Scalise and several congressional aides on Wednesday were shot while practicing for a baseball game, journalists on MSNBC and Twitter immediately politicized the attempted massacre, offering calls for gun control. 



Appearing as a panel member on Wednesday's CNN Newsroom with Carol Costello, TheRoot.com political editor and Morgan State University professor Jason Johnson -- a recurring guest on CNN -- suggested that GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump "continually associates himself with terrorist organizations like the Klan" as he responded to Trump's appearance at a black church in Ohio.

Johnson has a history of making incendiary accusations of racism against Republicans, and this past weekend appeared in a soundbite on the NBC Nightly News in which he cracked that Trump's base consists of "white voters, white voters, and white voters." TheRoot.com notably was acquired last year by Univision.



Appearing as a guest on Sunday's CNN Newsroom with Fredricka Whitfield to discuss Donald Trump declining to condemn former KKK leader David Duke in a CNN appearance earlier in the day, Jason Johnson of TheRoot.com not only repeated a discredited claim that Louisiana Republican Rep. Steve Scalise spoke to a white supremacist group in Louisiana in 2002, but he even gave the impression that Scalise spoke to the KKK "a couple of months ago."



On Monday's All In on MSNBC, host Chris Hayes repeated the discredited claim that originated with a liberal blogger that House Majority Whip Steve Scalise spoke at a convention for the European-American Unity and Rights Organization -- founded by white supremacist David Duke -- in the congressman's home state of Louisiana in 2002.



Nothing says celebrating nonviolent civil-rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. Day than calling for someone's "head on a platter," either literally or figuratively.

Enter Charles Ellison of the Philadelphia Tribune. In a panel discussion on the January 19 edition of MSNBC's Hardball, the liberal journalist lamented how the Congressional Black Caucus was not demanding the resignation of  Steve Scalise (R-La.) and how the Pelican State's lone Democratic congressman had defended Scalise against charges of racism.



MSNBC plays the race card 365 days a year, but on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, you can be sure they'll really ham it up. Witness MSNBC.com writer Jane Timm's pathetic attempt to bash the GOP as racist by bringing up decades-old votes on whether or not to make the civil-rights leader's birthday a federal holiday.

"GOP haunted by anti-MLK Day votes," blares a teaser headline on the msnbc.com home page. "Amid highly publicized racial tension in areas like Ferguson, Missouri and New York City, these nay votes have received renewed scrutiny and attention," adds the caption beneath a black-and-white photo of President Reagan signing into law a bill to make MLK Day a federal holiday.

 



Politico published a story stating as a "fact" that Steve Scalise spoke at a white supremacist event in 2002. However, this "fact" only stands up if the real facts are ignored which is what Politico shamefully did.



Ed Kilgore (at Talking Points Memo) and Mark Kleiman (at the Washington Monthly) agree that the Republican party has a serious racism problem but differ on what the GOP could or will do about it.



On Sunday morning, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich appeared on CBS’s Face the Nation to discuss a variety of topics including the ongoing controversy involving Congressman Steve Scalise (R-La.). During the conversation, moderator Bob Schieffer did his best to tie Scalise’s 2002 speech to the entire Republican brand. The CBS host suggested that “aren’t Republicans going to have to find some way to appeal to Hispanics and African Americans and what is that way because I think you would agree right now if you just look at it, it doesn't look like they're doing very much.”



On the heels of news that Republican majority whip Rep. Steve Scalise of Louisiana may have addressed a white nationalist group founded by David Duke, New York Times reporter Jeremy Alford did his best to smear today's Republican Party by linking it to the former Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan: "Much of David Duke’s ’91 Campaign Is Now in Louisiana Mainstream." Guilt by association is popular in the media when yoking fringe right-wing figures to the Republican Party, though Democrats never have to worry.



The media's much repeated narrative about House majority whip speaking a David Duke sponsored white supremacist event in 2002 has just been upended by an unexpected source...the liberal Slate.