The Big Three networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) pulled out all the stops and sharpened their knives for their effort to tear into the White House’s budget proposal on Thursday. “President Trump has unveiled his first budget proposal covering all the things the federal government pays for and how he wants to spend the money,” announced anchor Lester Holt during NBC Nightly News, “There's a lot more money for the military but there are critics who say popular programs and the poor would pay the price.”



Before White House press secretary Sean Spicer threw down with reporters over President Trump’s wiretap claims on Thursday, Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director Mick Mulvaney faced left-leaning questions on the President’s budget that included fears people will “suffer” as a result of the conservative proposals.



Thursday on ABC’s Good Morning America, anchor George Stephanopoulos blasted White House budget director Mick Mulvaney’s proposed budget as “dead on arrival,” complaining that it would never pass in Congress. Stephanopoulos even raised concerns about the budget not reducing the deficit, concerns the media didn’t have when Obama was in office and was proposing budgets that would massively increase the deficit.



On Monday's CNN Newsroom With John Berman and Poppy Harlow, co-anchor John Berman questioned former Congressional Budget Office Director Doug Elmendorf about the upcoming CBO figures of the Republican Party's replacement of ObamaCare. However, the CNN host failed to ask about the same office, under Elmendorf's watch, having inaccurately projected the financial impact of President Obama's health care law in 2009. 



Tuesday on ABC’s Good Morning America, anchor George Stephanopoulos interrogated Mick Mulvaney, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director, over President Trump’s proposed budget plan. The ABC journalist and former Clinton staffer downplayed the fiscal effects of the plan as inconsequential in balancing the budget while at the same time touting Democrats’ criticism that Trump was taking a “wrecking ball” to programs “that help the middle class.”

 


The Wall Street Journal's editorial board is rock-ribbed conservative, but its news pages often feature biased reporting that fits with the rest of the liberal media's narratives about conservatives and the GOP. Take Patrick O'Connor's 20-paragraph July 23 article, "Think Tank Becomes a Handful for GOP."

"For four decades, the Heritage Foundation was a stately think tank that sought to define conservative thinking for Republicans," O'Connor noted, lamenting that "Now, in one of the more significant transformations in the capital's intellectual firmament, it has become an activist political operation trying to alter the course of conservative thinking." In doing so, "[i]t now challenges establishment Republican leaders as much as it informs them, making waves in the process," O'Connor complained, going on to cite Republican congressmen complaining about Heritage's tactics, but failing to find pro-Heritage conservative GOPers to defend the organization.



As NewsBusters previously reported, MSNBC's Chris Matthews on Thursday admitted that Social Security is technically a Ponzi scheme.

Less than 24 hours earlier, in numerous post-debate discussions, the "Hardball" host criticized Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry for saying the same thing (video follows with transcript and commentary):



Tulane professor Melissa Harris-Perry, guest hosting on Rachel Maddow's MSNBC show last night, could hardly contain her mirth at the specter of an elected official actually praying for guidance while Congress struggles over the debt ceiling.

Here's Harris-Perry describing tea party Republicans facing the wrath of House Speaker John Boehner for not supporting his debt plan (video after page break) --



Granted, you may not have noticed any difference.

The Rev. Al Sharpton did his part for Republicans last night by arguing with one of them.

Sharpton, heir apparent to the 6-7 p.m. slot on MSNBC, tried to get the better of Rep. Mick Mulvaney, R-S.C., and ran into the immovable object of a smarter opponent.

Here's how their exchange ended, with Sharpton criticizing Mulvaney for opposing higher taxes to reach a deal on the debt ceiling (video after page break) --