At NewsBusters this morning, Matthew Philbin posted on how Michael Eric Dyson, in a guest appearance on MSNBC (where else?), placed a great deal of blame for Baltimore's blight on "the ways in which the Baltimore Ravens and Baltimore Orioles with their tax-exempt status were given tremendous goodies to stay into the city."

It would be reasonable to believe that Dyson, who has revealed a vengeful streak in the recent past, is quite pleased at the financial losses the Orioles, their employees, and businesses in the vicinity are being forced to absorb. Thanks to arguably necessary decisions made today, they will continue.



Professional race explainer Michael Eric Dyson said a lot of stupid things on MSNBC’s All In with Chris Hayes Monday. (Yes, it’s still on the air.) And really, that’s understandable, given that his job was to find excuses for the inexcusable violence and looting in Baltimore.

But mixed in with his litany of exculpatory urban dysfunction (“… the slow terror of expulsions from schools, rising rates of lead poisoning, the export of jobs to, uh, places across the waters …”) and awful metaphors (“it’s easy to point a gun of analysis and shoot [the rioters] with the bullets of our condemnation”) he managed to lash out at … professional sports.



Georgetown professor Michael Eric Dyson, himself an ordained Baptist preacher, was critical of black legislators and clergy who surrounded disgraced frat boy Levi Pettit at a March 25 press conference in which he apologized for his now-infamous racist chant about lynched blacks.



Sound the trumpets. The New York Times announced on March 18 that it is bringing in 20 new online-focused writers as contributors for its op-ed and Sunday Review sections. In an interview, Times editorial page editor Andrew Rosenthal claimed “We were looking for a broad range of viewpoints and subjects and backgrounds and geographical locations and every kind of form of diversity that you can think of.”

Lower the trumpets. Bring in the fact-checker. It seems the viewpoint-diverse Times can’t seem to locate a conservative acceptable to executives prowling the halls in the snooty Times offices in midtown Manhattan.



Wrapping up the Media Research Center’s “Best Notable Quotables of 2014,” it’s time to present the “Quote of the Year” for 2014, and the top two runners-up, as selected by our panel of judges.

 



On Thursday, the Media Research Center announced our “Best Notable Quotables of 2014,” as selected by a distinguished panel of 40 expert judges. Over the next several days, we’ll present these Notable Quotables as a way to review the worst media bias of 2014. Today, the winner and top runners-up for this year’s “Obamagasm Award.”

 



Two guests on this evening's Ed Show on MSNBC revealed what lies just below the surface for many in the current protest movement: opposition to capitalism.

First up was Rosa Clemente, a "hip hop activist" and 2008 Green Party VP candidate: "Capitalism, I think that is the institution all over this country. It is really the oppressive force." Next, Georgetown Prof. Marcia Chatelain, who said that the current moment has revealed "an incredible critique of capitalism that it isn't just police brutality but the way people are forced to live." Your $40,000/year tuition at work!



Rudy Giuliani fired back at Michael Eric Dyson on CNN's New Day on Tuesday for the MSNBC analyst's "white supremacy" attack on the former New York City mayor. When anchor Alisyn Camerota raised Giuliani's supposedly "controversial comments" from Sunday's Meet the Press on NBC, the former Republican politician underlined that he had "said the same thing the President of the United States said, and I was accused of being a racist."



On Sunday morning, a heated debate broke out on NBC’s Meet the Press between former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and MSNBC’s Michael Eric Dyson surrounding a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri’s eventual decision on whether or not to bring charges against Officer Darren Wilson for the shooting death of Michael Brown. During the combative segment, Mayor Giuliani argued that with regards to Ferguson “93 percent of blacks in America are killed by other blacks. We`re talking about the exception here.” Dyson, who is a frequent fill-in host on MSNBC, took particular offense to Giuliani’s comments and insisted that “ this is a defensive mechanism of white supremacy at work in your mind, sir.”



American women and homosexuals can really relate to the kind of treatment their Middle Eastern counterparts receive at the hands of Islamist terrorists. Oh sure, not the kidnapping, beheading, stoning, genital mutilation or acid attacks. Nobody’s toppling stone walls on them or burying them alive, and there’s pretty much zero chance of ending up face down in a ditch riddled with AK-47 rounds.

But that doesn’t mean American women and gays aren’t living through ISIS-style oppression at the hands of (wait for it!) Christians. Why, women have to pay for their own birth control and, in some places, getting an abortion is almost as much hassle as renewing your driver’s license. And there are people in the U.S. who don’t want to bake gay wedding cakes!

Just ask MSNBC talking heads Michael Eric Dyson and James Peterson. They lamented the Christian oppression on the Oct. 6 “Ed Show.” The hosts of Fox News’ ‘The Five’ didn’t let the comments slide by unnoticed, reacting with derision on the Oct.8 show.



MSNBC contributor Michael Eric Dyson is no stranger to effusive, over-the-top lobbying for Barack Obama. But on Saturday, he went so far that even fellow liberal host Melissa Harris Perry couldn't believe it. Dyson called on the President to speak out more about the rioting in Ferguson, Missouri, comparing, "I'm a Christian preacher and God finally said, 'look, I can't send nobody else. I got to go myself.'" 

Dyson continued, "And I ain't saying that Obama is Jesus, but for many of his followers he is." [See video below. MP3 audio here.] This comment was too much for Perry. She started laughing and marveled, "I think we've got to go, Reverend Dyson, because you just made the sentence, "'I'm not saying Obama is Jesus' and I don't want to get written up for that." 



On the July 23 edition of The Ed Show, host Ed Schultz and guest Michael Eric Dyson took turns attacking former NFL coach Tony Dungy for stating that he “wouldn’t want to deal” with the media attention that followed the drafting of Michael Sam, the NFL’s first openly-gay draftee.

While the other guest, national sport columnist Terence Moore, attempted to defend Dungy, Dyson compared his “attempt to justify prejudice and bigotry under the rubric of having questions about distractions” to the “light, racist viewpoints that were promoted by many white people who were not in the Ku Klux Klan” but still “resisted the progress of African-American people by undermining it.” Forget “light racism,” later in the interview Dyson compared the coach to an infamous Southern segregationist who employed police dogs and fire hoses on peaceful protesters. [See video below. Click here for MP3 audio]