White is ok, so long as it’s worn by the Democratic nominee. Two weeks ago, Philadelphia Enquirer fashion critic Elizabeth Wellington bashed Melania Trump for daring to wear a white dress for her RNC speech. Wellington acknowledged that “on a strictly fashion note,” Melania pulled off an “angelic look.” But the white designer dress was a “scary statement,” and supposedly gave off the subliminal message “that in the G.O.P. white is always right.”



In a rather bold display of liberal media bias on CNN Tonight, Peter Beinart a contributor to The Atlantic declared that Melania Trump’s American experience was somehow invalid compared to Michelle Obama’s. “She has not lived the story of America,” he slammed in the wee hours of Tuesday morning, “She does not understand the story of America.” Not only did he try to tear down Melania Trump he attacked the Republicans and glorified Michelle Obama. 



The debate rages on as to whether Donald Trump has remodeled or vandalized the Republican party. In any event, left-wing pundits spent the week gaping at, and writing about, what they viewed as the grotesque spectacle of the RNC. For example, Daily Kos’s Hunter opined that the convention was "was barely one step up from an internet-peddled snuff film,” and Salon’s Heather Digby Parton declared that “all that’s left of the ‘three-legged stool’ of conservatism is the seat — racism, nativism and xenophobia.”



Apparently, Washington Post fashion writer Robin Givhan isn’t the only newspaper dress-grader to drop political bombs into her critiques. Philadelphia Inquirer critic Elizabeth Wellington loved Melania Trump’s dress as an “an exquisitely put together if not angelic look.” But on a strictly political note, it apparently underlines her husband’s view that “white is always right.” She was a “not-so-subliminal billboard for what’s looking like the Trumpian view of an ideal America.”



Melania Trump’s speech at the Republican National Convention Monday night dominated the news this week, overshadowing other important stories and soliciting sexist attacks.



According to reform conservative (or former conservative) Frum, Republicans in Cleveland were feeling “embattled, defensive, and pessimistic” before the Melania Trump plagiarism story broke. Now, Frum speculated in a Tuesday piece for The Atlantic, “that mood of pessimism must be even grayer,” and since he lays out “ten reasons why Melania Trump’s speech matters and will continue to matter,” he clearly believes GOPers have ample reason to be down in the dumps, commenting that "suddenly there is one easy-to-understand incident that encapsulates in one grim joke all this convention’s cavalcade of derp."



Still harping on accusations of plagiarism against Melania Trump during an interview with Donald Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort on Thursday’s NBC Today, co-host Matt Lauer demanded an apology from the GOP operative for suggesting Hillary Clinton’s campaign was fueling the story: “You even went as far as to blame Hillary Clinton....you said, ‘When Hillary Clinton is threatened by a female, the first thing she does is try to destroy that person,’ would you offer Secretary Clinton an apology for blaming her?”



Some folks, like Cosmopolitan writer Brittany Cooper, see racism everywhere. Melania Trump’s Monday night speech sparked ridicule and outrage from people on both sides of the aisle. Plagiarism is stupid and dishonest, and denying it in the face of evidence is…stupid and dishonest. But for the unhinged Brittany Cooper, any defense of Melania is just another example of white privilege. 



It’s been a day and a half since the establishment liberal media sank their jaws into the Melania Trump “plagiarism” story, and they are showing few signs of letting go, with heavy coverage on the broadcast networks’ Tuesday evening and Wednesday morning news shows. Eight years ago, however, when a similar flap threatened then-Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama, the broadcast networks generated much less coverage — just 14 minutes of airtime, or barely one-fourth what they’ve churned out this week.



Playing on long-established stereotypes of the melanin-challenged Republican Party, New York Times coverage of the Republican National Convention on Wednesday put racial controversies front and center, accusing speakers (particularly Rudy GIuliani) of lecturing and moralizing to blacks about law and order as an all-white crowd lapped it up. The paper led with Melanie Trump's speech with this wishful thinking headline: “How Speech for a Trump Stumbled Toward Ridicule – As G.O.P. Nominates the Businessman, His Wife’s Oration Shadows Convention.”



On Tuesday, the Morning Joe conversation was dominated by allegations of Melania Trump plagiarizing her highly anticipated speech last night from portions of Michelle Obama’s speech at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. The mainstream media’s double standard radiated when the focus shifted to past allegations of plagiarism by prominent Democrats Joe Biden and Barack Obama. 



In September 1987, Joe Biden quit the race for the 1988 Democratic presidential nomination, in large part because he’d been caught plagiarizing a speech by British politician Neil Kinnock. A Tuesday Daily Kos post seemed to suggest that Biden should have dropped out back then even if it’d been his wife, Jill, exposed as a high-profile plagiarist…or maybe David Nir has a different standard for Republicans. “Melania Trump’s stunning plagiarism at the Republican National Convention should by all rights be fatal to her husband’s campaign for president, not merely because she plagiarized but because of who she plagiarized from,” declared Nir, who noted that Melania “stole from none other than Michelle Obama, whose family has been the target of the right’s most bitter hatred and ridicule for a decade now.”