On Sunday's morning's This Week show on ABC, hos Martha Raddatz asked normally unflappable Hillary Clinton supporter Cokie Roberts about the "deep mistrust" voters have towards presumptive Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton. Concerning her campaign, Roberts responded that "I don’t think they have a clue how to fix it." That's understandable. How do you "fix" a media-enabled problem at least two decades in the making?

Raddatz tried to deflect discussion of Mrs. Clinton's serious problem by telling people to go see the play Hamilton. Roberts took the cue, and in a bizarre non sequitur, said that Alexander Hamilton "lied too, to his wife."



On her 12 p.m. ET hour show on Monday, MSNBC host Andrea Mitchell gifted viewers with a trip down memory lane to Hillary Clinton’s “amazing” college days. A mere twenty-one years old at the time of the speech, Clinton represented her classmates at the 1969 Commencement of Wellesley College. The way Andrea Mitchell and The Wall Street Journal's Jeanne Cummings fawned over the speech was akin to Chris Matthews describing the thrill he gets up his leg every time he hears Obama speak.



On Tuesday's CNN Tonight, during a discussion of Donald Trump making an issue of Hillary Clinton being an "enabler" of her husband, Bill Clinton, abusing women, host Don Lemon seemed unaware of the kinds of accusations made by women like Juanita Broaddrick and Kathleen Willey that Hillary Clinton had taken part in efforts to intimidate them into silence about sexual assaults.

At one point, Lemon cluelessly commented: "This is the first time that I think that I've heard of in any situation ... where the woman who was cheated on is now being accused of doing something wrong. Usually, women stand behind a woman who was cheated on rather than saying, 'Well, she enabled.' If someone cheated on me, I'm not going to say nice things about the person they cheated on with."



On Wednesday's New Day, during a discussion of Donald Trump attacking Hillary Clinton over scandals from the 1990s, CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin wrongly claimed that Hillary "was not someone who was accused even of doing anything untoward with regard to these women," and then laughed when host Alisyn Camerota jumped in to correct him.



Reacting to NBC’s Andrea Mitchell claiming on Thursday that her 1999 rape accusation against Bill Clinton was “discredited,” Juanita Broaddrick blasted the reporter: “Andrea is obviously mad at me for exposing her rudeness and bias when she called me this year. I think being a lapdog for Hillary Clinton discredits Andrea Mitchell and NBC as journalists!”



Contributing to the media's rush to discredit Donald Trump's resurrecting of former President Bill Clinton's marital infidelities in his campaign against wife Hillary, Bloomberg's With All Due Respect co-host John Heilemann chided Trump on Thursday for "play[ing] the rape card" and predicted it'd be of no benefit to him going forward towards November.



Steer clear of the Clinton scandals, it’s bound to backfire, the New York Times warned presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump on Tuesday. It’s been the paper's same helpful advice to Republicans since 1992. Patrick Healy, a fierce journalistic defender of the former first lady, took up arms for Hillary Clinton and her “decades of experience and qualifications” defeating various forms of “boorishness.”



The New York Times made a big splash Sunday with an over-the-fold front-page story, “Crossing the Line: Trump’s Private Conduct With Women.” Five Times reporters talked to female former Trump executives, his ex-wife Ivana, and various models and beauty pageant contestants told unflattering stories about Trump, many of them 20 years old. The Times teased: “Interviews reveal unwelcome advances, a shrewd reliance on ambition, and unsettling workplace conduct over decades.” Also revealed: The paper’s stark double standards on its treatment of politicized sexual harassment claims. Did former president Bill Clinton’s sexual history or his multiple sex (and worse) scandals get this sort of front-page over-the-fold analysis? Hardly. In fact, during the 1992 campaign, the Times referred to blockbuster rape allegations made against Clinton by former Arkansas nursing home administrator Juanita Broaddrick as “toxic waste."



On Monday's The View on ABC, as the group discussed GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump making an issue of Hillary Clinton's treatment of women who had been assaulted or harassed by or had affairs with her husband, co-hosts Whoopi Goldberg and Paula Faris got into a heated debate in which Goldberg ranted in defense of Hillary Clinton, and at one pointed bizarrely seemed to blame women for trying to have affairs with Bill Clinton. Goldberg: "She didn't do anything. It was done against her. Those women had tried to have affairs with her husband, the married part of that twosome, you know?"



Donald Trump has wasted no time in "going there": accusing Hillary Clinton of being an enabler of Bill's sexual misconduct with women. So will the MSM ask Hillary about her role in hushing up the scandals, intimidating the women, etc? No, according to Mark Halperin, not unless the MSM is "forced" to do so.

Said Halperin on today's With All Due Respect"I don't think a reporter will ask unless they're basically forced to." Halperin and Heilemann did hold out one intriguing possibility: that some "new information, some more recent information" about Bill's peccadilloes could force the MSM's hand. Added Halperin tantalizingly, with Heilemann's agreement: "Trump thinks he knows some new facts, by the way."



As Friday's CNN Newsroom with Carol Costello devoted a segment to discussing the reasons so many young women are siding with Bernie Sanders in the Democratic presidential race instead of Hillary Clinton, Daily Beast columnist Keli Goff oddly claimed that Hillary Clinton has been a "victim of her own success" as she theorized that there is less hunger for electing a woman President because it has become so commonplace for women to be elected to offices since the 1990s.

Goff did not explain why other women getting elected constitutes a "success" for Hillary Clinton. At one point, host Costello surprisingly brought up Hillary Clinton's history of helping her husband cover up sexual misconduct, vaguely alluding to his sexual assault history with the words "infidelity or worse."



What the liberal media have routinely failed to do, since the 1990s, is tell their audiences how Hillary Clinton was not some innocent bystander, but was just as guilty in attacking those women who could’ve been a threat to their rise to power.