Ever since former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani stated on Thursday that “I do not believe that the president loves America,” the people in the “mainstream media” have produced more than 8,000 articles on the comment -- which was made at a private Manhattan dinner for 60 or so political donors -- in just a few days.

That led Sean Spicer, communications director for the Republican National Committee, to release a statement on Tuesday in which he noted: “Coverage has been fueled by reporters grasping for new angles or asking any Republican in range of a microphone to respond to his comments and other unrelated questions.”



Newsweek has suggested a couple of activities that Bill Clinton could have been involved in while visiting  Jeffrey Epstein's Sex Fiend Island: chatting about theoretical physics or getting massages from pretty girls. What could it be? What could it be?



CNN.com published two stories in a row last week about the developing Sex Fiend Island scandal. Most of the focus was on Prince Andrew while a certain former president was noticeably missing despite being mentioned in numerous stories from sources other than CNN.
 



Correction: This post originally referred to Variety as the publication involved. It was Vanity Fair, and the text below has been corrected to reflect that.

At the Daily Beast on Tuesday, Vicky Ward, who profiled Jeffrey Epstein for Vanity Fair Magazine in early 2003, revealed that she and Graydon Carter, the publication's editor, were aware of and had specific details about the convicted ultrarich creep's sexual episodes with underage girls. They also apparently had proof that Epstein had forged denial documents from two of his victims. Epstein had recently become publicly visible as a result of his 2002 African travels with former President Bill Clinton.

At the last minute, Carter almost completely spiked the sexual elements of Ward's story, leaving only vague references to Victoria's Secret models, a party "filled ... with young Russian models" and to "beautiful women ... whisked off to Little St. James (in the Virgin Islands)." The published product focused almost entirely on the mystery of Epstein's career as a broker, including his admission to securities law violations, his subsequent business dealings, and his quirky but often lavish purchases and lifestyle.