Many persons have started thinking about President Trump’s re-election campaign. One, of course, is Trump himself. Another is lefty pundit Paul Waldman, who in a September 27 column for The Week argued that while recent approval ratings for Trump don’t augur well for his winning a second term, he might pull it off if he cribs from Karl Rove’s 2004 playbook.



On Wednesday's New Day, Chris Cuomo was displaying his liberal bias over and over again during discussions of President Donald Trump's decision to end the DACA program. The CNN host's commentary ranged from accusing Trump of "feeding fear and anger," to trying to give cover to former President Barack Obama by declaring that "Obama did not invent 'Dreamers."

 



The Associated Press couldn't keep race and income out of its coverage of Hurricane Harvey and Houston's recovery from it. Those angles were wholly predictable and tiresome, but the wire service's Juliet Linderman also decided she would tell readers what the establishment press has from all appearances unilaterally and falsely decided should be the conventional wisdom about the impact of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, namely that it "stands as a prime example of urban inequality and environmental injustice." Horse manure.



I have experienced defeat in presidential politics many times. Actually, I expect most Americans have. You win some, and you lose some. I first experienced defeat in 1964 when then-Sen. Barry Goldwater went down, though I was not even old enough to vote. I experienced it in 1968. I experienced it again in 1976, when my candidate was Ronald Reagan.



Appearing as a panel member on Saturday's AM Joy, MSNBC contributor Jason Johnson -- known for his many race-obsessed comments and his column at The Root -- fretted that, allegedly unlike white men, California Democratic Senator Kamala Harris would face questions about her "competency" if she runs for President in 2020. 



Liberal activist and film maker Michael Moore has decided to celebrate his Twitter account surpassing the five million mark by doing what he loves best: trying yet again to bring down GOP President Donald Trump. On Monday, July 24, the creator of such “schlockumentaries” as Fahrenheit 9/11 -- a 2004 film criticizing then-President George W. Bush -- and Sicko, in which Moore sought expert opinion on health-care systems from his parents, will donate $1,000 to the anti-Trump group supported by each of five followers of his website.



How "far right" can Texas go? The scare-mongering theme about “vanishing Republican moderates” is a popular myth at the Times and other liberal media outlets, especially in red states like Texas. The New York Times really went overboard with it Wednesday in “Bathroom Bill Tests the Clout of a Rare Moderate in Texas” by Manny Fernandez and David Montgomery. Fernandez, Houston bureau chief for the Times, is clearly not comfortable in what he has called “ultraconservative Texas.”



"Where there is no vision, the people perish..." (Proverbs 29:18) In 1987 when he was contemplating a run for president, Vice President George H.W. Bush was criticized for his inability to articulate an agenda for the country. A friend suggested he spend a weekend alone at Camp David to figure out where he would take the nation. "Oh, the vision thing," Bush replied disparagingly. Though he won the 1988 election, the quote would haunt him.



In their never-ending quest to hammer Donald Trump, reporters in the liberal Washington Post referred to an international poll conducted by the Pew Research Center not once, but twice in two days claiming that the Republican president “has alarmed citizens of the nation’s closest allies and others worldwide.” In addition, the article posted on Monday by Post reporters Isaac Stanley-Becker and Scott Clement was followed the next day by an item from Aaron Blake, the newspaper’s senior political reporter, who quoted the four “most brutal numbers” in the survey that show how much the world hates Donald Trump.



Last this week, The Washington Post published an article saying that the Obama administration knew well in advance of Election Day 2016 that Russia was trying to meddle the U.S. election process but chose not to go public out of fear that many would think President Obama was swaying the election to Hillary Clinton. During NBC’s Sunday Today, Chuck Todd let his true feelings show when equated Obama not putting his figure on the electoral scale to President Bush not acting on intelligence reports about Osama bin Laden before the 9/11 attacks.



The headline in the March 5, 1929 edition of the Chicago Tribune read, "Plain Citizen Coolidge Shuts Desk and Quietly Goes Home." Calvin Coolidge would write a newspaper column from Northampton, Massachusetts, for which he presumably was paid a pittance, but other than that he refused to exploit his notoriety or accomplishments as president for money.



Someone needs to tell the folks at the Comedy Central cable television channel that in order to have the word “Comedy” in your name, you should actually be funny. A perfect example of this concept gone wrong aired on Thursday evening, April 27, when the low-rated channel debuted The President Show, which mostly consists of President Donald Trump impersonator Anthony Atamanuik sitting in the Oval Office with Peter Grosz as Vice President Mike Pence nearby.