Fidel Castro’s communist regime executed hundreds of political opponents and drove tens of thousands more into exile; hundreds of dissidents today languish in Cuban prisons. Yet liberals in the U.S. media — who rightly condemned such abuses when perpetrated by dictators such as Chile’s Augusto Pinochet — inexplicably remain enchanted with Castro and his socialist revolution. For almost 30 years, the Media Research Center has documented the liberal media’s infatuation with Fidel Castro and Cuba’s communism; details within.



Fidel Castro was a tyrant who oppressed Cubans and brought misery to many for several decades and while much of the breaking news coverage emphasized that reality, some journalists couldn’t resist crediting him for supposed great advancements in education, literacy and health care. ABC’s Jim Avila went so far as to tout how Castro “was considered, even to this day, the George Washington of his country” and, reminiscing about his high school years, Chris Matthews asserted Castro was “a romantic figure when he came into power” who “was almost like a folk hero to most of us.”



Univision news anchor Jorge Ramos used the opportunity of being a guest on CBS's Late Show With Stephen Colbert on Thursday night to criticize Donald Trump's use of the term “bad hombres” during his final debate with Democrat Hillary Clinton on Wednesday.

The GOP candidate for president used the phrase while discussing his views on illegal immigration, which led Colbert to call Trump a “loco hombre” before discussing Ramos's new documentary, Hate Rising, to explore the Republican campaign's “connection to racism and white nationalism.”



For the second day in a row, the New York Times hailed a Communist and Fidel Castro supporter on the front of its Arts page. On Friday, it was former Communist Party vice presidential candidate Angela Davis who got red-carpet treatment. On Saturday, the Times senior staff editor for culture Tamara Best conducted a fulsome interview with 89-year-old entertainer Harry Belafonte, “Old Warrior Takes Stock But Continues the Fight” that was teased on the front Arts page: “Harry Belafonte: ‘Movements Don’t Die.’”



Five years ago, the Associated Press was so excited about the imminent 85th birthday of Fidel Castro, Communist Cuba's dictator emeritus, that its Images Group promoted a package of "iconic images and videos" subscribing outlets could purchase and use. It described Castro as a "source of inspiration for many people throughout the world."

Thus, it should surprise no one that the wire service, which has been credibly accused of active cooperation with Adolf Hitler's Nazi propaganda machine during the eight years before the U.S. entered World War II, appears to be quite pumped up about El Jefe's 90th birthday. Reporter Andrea Rodriguez's July 29 story, published over two weeks ahead of the blessed event, portrays how Castro "has taken on a powerful new role ... as the inspiration for Cubans who want to maintain strict Communist orthodoxy." Oh boy.



In what was otherwise a solid interview of President Obama that focused heavily on communist Cuba’s horrid human rights record, ABC’s World News Tonight anchor David Muir dropped the ball when he wondered if Cuban President Raul Castro is onto something when criticizing the United States for not being an authority on human rights when the U.S. lacks guaranteed rights to food and health care. “But when he says health care, does he have a point?”



On Monday's New Day, CNN's Chris Cuomo revealed that he was wearing his father's guayabera shirt, which was "given to him by Fidel Castro as a gift." Cuomo, who was covering President Obama's visit to Cuba, underlined that "it didn't mean something to him [his father] because it came from Fidel Castro necessarily, but because it marked conversations going on decades ago that were the same as those today."



Sure, he was a murdering dictator who imprisoned any and all who opposed him and suppressed any dissent through brutal repression. But man, could he appreciate a great curve ball.



Appearing as a panel member for Tuesday's election coverage on CNN, liberal commentator Van Jones went over the top again as he compared GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump to a "strongman" like former Cuban dictator Fidel Castro.

At about 8:10 p.m. ET, shortly before Marco Rubio announced that he was ending his campaign for President, Jones suggested that Rubio might stay in longer because Trump reminds him of the "strongman" who took control of his home country who "from his point of view, was violent, was irresponsible."



Penny Starr at CNSNews.com found an appalling example of journalistic fawning over the Castro brothers of communist Cuba on All Things Considered, the evening newscast of taxpayer-subsidized National Public Radio.

Ramon Castro, the older brother of Fidel and Raul Castro, died last week at age 91, and she recounted how he kissed her cheeks three times, one for each Castro brother. "It was kind of like getting the blessing of the Holy Trinity."



According to an exclusive interview posted Tuesday on The Hollywood Reporter website, Jennifer Lawrence -- a liberal actress who played heroine Katmiss Everdeen in the four-part Hunger Games series of science-fiction movies -- has been chosen to portray Marita Lorenz in Marita, a “romantic spy drama” that will focus on the German-born woman who was sent to Cuba to assassinate Fidel Castro but instead fell in love with the dictator.

In the real world, Lawrence has not been shy when discussing her liberal philosophy, which led her to state during an article on the Entertainment Weekly website: "If Donald Trump becomes president, that will be the end of the world.”



Good Morning America journalist Terry Moran on Monday hailed Pope Francis’s “unforgettable” meeting with the “revolutionary” Fidel Castro. Moran also skimped on coverage of protesters who spoke out. The reporter gushed, “An unforgettable moment: The Pope meets with Fidel Castro, the 89-year-old revolutionary and a Pope who is shaking up the world, too.”