Politics involves the heart and the mind, and in general the best politicians appeal to both. Then there’s Donald Trump. Jonathan Chait of New York magazine argues that Trump’s campaign is pretty close to mindless, but it seems that to many rank-and-file Republicans, that’s a feature rather than a bug.

“Outsiders have struggled to comprehend how Republican voters can attach themselves to an economic agenda so plainly at odds with their own interest, or whip themselves into a frenzy over a manufactured outrage,” wrote Chait in a Tuesday post. “Trump embodies that mysterious X factor that has eluded analysts of all sides…Trump is not the spokesman for an idea at all, but the representation of undifferentiated resentment.”



Donald Trump enjoys a higher favorability rating among Latino Republicans than Jeb Bush and every other candidate in the Republican presidential field, Univision reported.



There are currently 17 declared candidates for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, but viewers of the three broadcast evening news shows this year have mainly heard about just two of them: former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, and New York businessman Donald Trump. And even though Trump received virtually no TV news attention until he officially declared on June 16, he’s received far more network news coverage than Bush has received all year.



Strange new respect? Two days after the New York Times labeled real estate mogul and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump a racist on its front page based on thin evidence, the Times is suddenly treating one of his Twitter pronouncements as newsworthy, with Ashley Parker devoting an entire story to Trump's tweet. Perhaps because he's attacking his fellow GOP candidates as "puppets" of the libertarian Koch Brothers, themselves a frequent target of the Times.



Almost a quarter-century ago, Seal sang, “We're never gonna survive unless we get a little crazy.” These days, suggests Talking Points Memo’s Josh Marshall, it’s awfully hard to survive in the Republican presidential race if you’re only a little crazy, now that Donald Trump “has flooded the market with a new, purer brand of Crazy that has left the other candidates scrambling and basically unable to compete.”

“Trump is in many ways the logical end result of seven years -- really two-plus decades -- of Republican cultivation of anger and grievance as a method of conducting politics,” asserted Marshall in a Monday post, adding that Trump “has managed to boil modern Republicanism down to a hard precipitate form, shorn of the final vestiges of interest in actual governing.”



This week, liberal journalists use Donald Trump's rise as another reason to bash conservatives, with NBC's Chuck Todd suggesting this is a "reap-what-you-sow" moment for the GOP, even as CNN's Nia-Malika Henderson blasts that "the politics of... race baiting have defined the Republican Party for quite some time." And The Daily Beast's Jonathan Alter says it's "not a partisan comment," but "there's a vileness gap between our political parties" — with Republicans, of course, being the only ones guilty of nasty rhetoric.



Are you a professional comedian or someone who just wants to entertain your friends by doing a Donald Trump impression? Well I have huge news for you. HUUGE!!!

Voice impressionist Eric Harthen has produced a How To video for folks wanting to do an impression of The Donald. This instructional video will probably come in handy right after this Thursday's presidential debate among the Repulican candidates. Harthen's video explains how to position your mouth with pronounced bottom front teeth while talking. In addition, he covers the proper decibel level of the voice. Finally, don't forget to get the correct Queens borough (not guttural Bronx) accent correct when doing the impression.



Liberal MSNBC anchor Lawrence O'Donnell on Thursday night slammed Ronald Reagan, sneering that he was the "Donald Trump of his time." O'Donnell asserted that, just like Trump and Sarah Palin, Reagan was a liar on subjects like Medicare. Comparing Reagan to Trump, O'Donnell insulted, "One of the loudest opponents of Medicare was actor Ronald Reagan, who was then the Donald Trump of his time, a celebrity with no governing experience and very forceful opinions about government." 



As if one had to be "far right wing" to oppose giving legal status to most of the country's millions of illegal immigrants, CNN political analyst Margaret Hoover on Friday's New Day asserted that the "far right wing of the Republican Party" will oppose Donald Trump's plan to allow the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants already in the U.S. to acquire legal status.



Chastised by former GOP chairman Michael Steele for her haughty, condescending attitude towards"low[est] common denominator middle-class Republican voters who are at the very least giving Donald Trump a fair hearing, Salon editor-at-large Joan Walsh shot back, "I'm much more one of them than he is," adding, "I wasn't born to wealth, for God's sake, Michael Steele!"



This is fodder for WSJ columnist James Taranto's "everything is seemingly spinning out of control" file. Howard Dean has declared that we'll have to be "more humble" about Donald Trump's prospects and that he will "have to stop making fun" of him for now.

What's got Dean doing a 180 on Trump? Not just the latest polls, which include one showing Trump trouncing Jeb and Rubio in their home state of Florida. Above all, it was the experience of viewing, on today's Morning Joe, a stunning focus group of New Hampshire Republicans who were uniformly and enthusiastically pro-Trump, saying things like "honest; Reaganesque; one of us; we could be a proud America."



During an appearance on Wednesday’s edition of The Kelly File on the Fox News Channel (FNC), Media Research Center Brent Bozell and host Megyn Kelly eviscerated the media for their double standard in rushing to cover unsubstantiated rape allegations surrounding 2016 GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump but not, among others, the Bill Clinton-Juanita Brodderick case.