Both Republicans and Democrats have faced serious allegations of sexual misconduct, but in the month of November, ABC, CBS and NBC spent twice as much time telling viewers about the Republicans’ problems. Nearly two-thirds of this coverage (4 hours, 27 minutes) focused on Republican politicians, compared to 2 hours, 6 minutes spent on the Democrats, a greater than two-to-one disparity.



Near the end of Wednesday’s State of America on CNN International, the show published a head-scratching graphic that placed Republican Congressman Joe Barton (Tex.) alongside other political figures who, unlike Barton, have been accused of sexual misconduct. To make matters worse, CNN political commentator Angela Rye ripped into “white, liberal women” for supposedly forcing House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi to call for Democratic Congressman John Conyers (Mich.) to resign.



The English poet of the Middle Ages, Geoffrey Chaucer, is generally credited with coining the phrase that has been updated in modern English to read, "better late than never." It means to do something or to arrive later than expected may not be good, but it is better than not at all. That may not be true in the case of former President Bill Clinton's enablers and apologists for his sexual misdeeds before and after winning the White House.



On Sunday's AM Joy, there was another case of liberal projection as MoveOn.org senior advisor and frequent MSNBC guest Karine Jean-Pierre complained that "We have a sexual predator as the President of the United States who lies constantly." This in spite of the fact that the group she works for was founded in 1998 primarily for the purpose of defending President Bill Clinton from impeachment over his sexual misbehavior.



New York Times columnist Michelle Goldberg continued on Tuesday’s Hardball to dig herself a hole when it comes to being inconsistent on sexual misconduct claims, bewailing to host Chris Matthews that “Republicans will certainly milk the Al Franken thing” while touting leftists as true moral arbiters purging alleged miscreants from their ranks.



In spite of repeated proclamations from MSNBC pundits that anyone expressing a scintilla of skepticism about any claims of sexual misconduct must therefore support that gross misbehavior, MSNBC’s best and brightest repeatedly broke this self-imposed standard over the past week vis-a-vis the Al Franken sexual assault allegations. Morning Joe added to this shamelessly hypocritical coverage on Tuesday, questioning if the latest Franken accuser can “prove” her accusation that Franken shoved his tongue in her mouth. The hosts also waffled on whether or not Franken should suffer any serious consequences for his alleged sexual crimes, with co-host Willie Geist wondering whether Franken should be treated as a “pariah” and “have his life ruined and thrown out.”



Last week, New York Times columnist Michelle Goldberg wrote an op-ed calling for Al Franken to resign in light of radio broadcaster Leeann Tweeden’s claims that the Democratic senator sexually assaulted her multiple times while on a USO tour to the Middle East to entertain American troops back in 2006. However, on Monday, Goldberg published another piece retracting her original call for Franken to be replaced. She primarily based her new argument on the grounds that Franken’s support for “women’s rights” should preclude him from being subjected to feminists’ purported standards for alleged sexual abusers. Goldberg also fretted that getting rid of the senator at this point would set a dangerous precedent that would “risk unilateral disarmament” for Democrats in the political arena.



Why do people who identify as feminist betray themselves when men aligned with them are accused of the worst?

The women of Saturday Night Live released a statement “Offer[ing] Solidarity in Support of Al Franken.” In their statement, assistants, writers, photographers, and cast members stated that they “are moved to quickly and directly affirm that after years of working with him, we would like to acknowledge that not one of us ever experienced any inappropriate behavior; and mention our sincere appreciation that he treated each of us with the utmost respect and regard.”



Monday brought a deluge of new sexual harassment allegations implicating high profile men across the worlds of politics and journalism. Among the accused was CBS’s Charlie Rose, which was adequately reported by the Big Three Networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC). But in stark contrast, they completely omitted the emerging allegations against New York Times White House Correspondent Glenn Thrush, and the second accuser of Democratic Senator Al Franken went grossly under reported.



Given the extensive coverage of the allegations of criminal sexual misconduct against Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore, you may be wondering how liberal journalists have been covering the multiple accusations of sexual assault against Democratic Senator Al Franken. Well, if you were expecting unreserved condemnation and calls for Franken to resign his seat, you would be pretty disappointed, at least if you were watching MSNBC.



As reports came in Monday morning of another woman claiming she was groped by Minnesota Senator Al Franken, MSNBC anchor Stephanie Ruhle seemed to downplay the new allegations against the Democratic lawmaker. She warned that judging Franken’s behavior too harshly would lead down a “slippery slope.”



Last week, television and radio host Leeann Tweeden shared her story of being violated and sexually harassed by Minnesota Democratic Senator Al Franken in 2006. On Monday, another woman came forward accusing Franken of grabbing her behind while posing for a photo in 2010. Already liberals in the media were out ready to squash the stories as insignificant slips that can in no way tarnish the character of the sitting lawmaker.