On Friday, Lisa Marie Pane and Emily Swanson at the Associated Press betrayed more than a little sadness that "The slaying of five dozen people in Las Vegas did little to change Americans’ opinions about gun laws." This unfortunate (in their view) polling result was achieved despite a ridiculous weighting of the poll's sample towards Democrats accompanied by a failure to identify the overall political outlooks (vs. party affiliations) of those who were sampled.



On Wednesday, "the Cook County (Illinois) Board of Commissioners repealed the penny-an-ounce levy on sweetened beverages it passed last November." The inflammatory "Big Soda" label appears frequently in press coverage of this reversal of what the government-always-knows-best crowd had thought was a major nanny-state victory, and reflects the fact that many in the media are quite unhappy with this turn of events.



AP's David Crary filed a slanted report on Thursday that spotlighted the complaints of left-wing organizations regarding hate crime laws that, in their view, are "rarely used to prosecute the slayings" of "transgender" individuals. Crary zeroed in on a murder case in Missouri where " a transgender teen...was stabbed in the genitals." He used the homicide as a jumping-off point to cite several activists, who bemoaned that the "[hate crime] provisions have led to few prosecutions."



Jay Reeves and Kim Chandler did their best to portray Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore as an extremist in a Wednesday item for the Associated Press. The pair led their report by playing up that Moore "wouldn’t stand a chance in many Senate races after defying federal court orders, describing Islam as a false religion, calling homosexuality evil and pulling out a revolver on stage before hundreds of supporters."



Since Imran Awan's arrest in late July, the Daily Caller has published roughly two dozen follow-up stories on various aspects of the scandal involving the longtime rogue Democrat IT staffer and his inexplicably enriched family members. The Associated Press and the New York Times have, from all appearances, published nothing since July 28.



On Tuesday, Joshua Goodman of the Associated Press trumpeted that the economic "misery is likely to get even worse" in Venezuela due to new sanctions implemented by the Trump administration. Goodman acknowledged that the South American country is becoming "increasingly authoritarian," but didn't once describe the regime of President Nicolas Maduro as left-wing. He also cited an expert who asserted that possible additional sanctions might "throw Venezuela back to the stone ages."



Seth Borenstein touted in a Tuesday report for the Associated Press that some scientists believe that Hurricane Harvey is a "soggy, record-breaking glimpse of the wet and wild future that global warming could bring." Even after acknowledging that these climate researchers are "quick to say that climate change didn't cause Harvey and...haven't determined yet whether the storm was made worse by global warming," Borenstein underlined that they believe that "warmer air and water mean wetter and possibly more intense hurricanes in the future."



Wednesday morning at 12:05 a.m. Eastern Time (9:05 p.m. Tuesday Phoenix time), Reuters tweeted a photo with the following description: "Pro-Trump supporters face off with peace activists during protests outside a Trump rally in Phoenix." The photo by the wire service's Sandy Huffaker also appears in a photo montage at the UK Guardian with the caption "Pro-Trump supporters face off with peace activists."



The Associated Press, in covering the Islamic terrorist attacks in Barcelona and Cambril, Spain last week which which killed at least 14 people, twice noted that the attacks were carried out by an "Islamic terrorist cell." But not even the obvious facts about the attacks in Spain could move Reuters, arguably the world's leading wire service with obviously heavy influence in the U.S., to properly label the attacks.



In what has to be seen as a bit of a welcome change from the norm, Friday morning coverage at the Associated Press of the Thursday terror attacks in Spain which, as of the time this post was written, had killed a total 14 and injured 125, many seriously, hasn't gone wobbly or weaselly. That said, there's one connection the AP and others in the press haven't made. Someone needs to.



On Tuesday morning, the Associated Press left no doubt that it does not want to see detailed news of the outrageous United Auto Workers-Fiat Chrysler training scandal spread beyond Metro Detroit. In an unbylined item which digested far longer reports seen at Detroit's major newspapers down to five paragraphs, the wire service kept the union out of its headline, failed to mention the union until the fourth paragraph, and omitted almost all of the details which caused a Chrysler financial analyst to plead guilty to his role in the conspiracy.



Leave it to the wire service providing national and world news to hundreds of American newspapers to leave people scratching their heads. On Thursday night, the Associated Press (AP) tweeted a confusing question about whether the U.S. military “should” take action to shoot down North Korean missiles if they’re headed towards Guam or any U.S. state.