It was a throwback to the bad old days of laughably obvious labeling bias at the New York Times. Reporter Tiffany Hsu Stark demonstrated the other end of that stark double standard on Tuesday, with the news that “Nation Editor To Step Down But Stay On As Publisher.” Hsu’s piece contained not a single ideological label to identify the hard-left magazine that has dallied for decades with defending totalitarians on the left. Yet the Weekly Standard, a right-leaning anti-Trump publication that was far closer to the mainstream of American politics, was larded with labels in articles fabout the Standard’s controversial shutdown.



WASHINGTON — It had to happen. The United States of America has been the most desirable piece of real estate to inhabit for more than 200 years. It was only a matter of time before outsiders took note of our open borders to the north and the south and decided to enter without proper documentation. Those borders have been sparsely patrolled. And so, they entered by the thousands, probably by the millions, some bringing garbage, as commentator Tucker Carlson recently observed, others bringing criminal records, virtually none bringing documents attesting to their legal entry. What was to be done?



The front page of Tuesday’s New York Times focused on the Trump administration “planning to roll back Obama-era policies aimed at ensuring that minority children are not unfairly disciplined, arguing that the efforts have eased up on punishment and contributed to rising violence in the nation’s schools.” Reporters Erica Green and Katie Benner don’t seem to approve of the move, though they make a stronger attempt at balance than the headlines: "Trump’s Parkland Inquiry Shifts To Attack on an Obama Legacy.” The inside-page headline: “Trump Parkland Panel Attacks Obama Policy On Race and Schools.”



Journalists sometimes ignore facts and evidence in order to promote an ideological narrative. For example, journalists peddled the Duke Lacrosse and University of Virginia rape hoaxes even after they were debunked.  They also continue to distort the facts about a 1991 Supreme Court nomination, in which the FBI and members of the U.S. Senate rejected as unfounded claims that Judge Clarence Thomas said sexually offensive things to Anita Hill.



In mid-May, the Associated Press's Ken Thomas devoted over 800 words to the Center for American Progress's "Ideas Conference." Given that level of recognition, one might think that the AP and Thomas might have covered a blatantly false tweet the think tank published Monday about potential Donald Trump Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett by now. Nope.



In online news, there's "clickbait," a sensational headline which doesn't reflect the underlying story. The New York Daily News took that concept into the front page of its Tuesday print edition. Its headline — "DADDY'S LITTLE GHOUL" — included a photo of Ivanka Trump. The underlying article mentioned her only once in passing. We should call this "printbait."



I noted on Tuesday that The Weekly Standard reported that CNN's Michelle Kosinski strongly questioned State Department's Michael Kozak on Trump bashing the press when the department's human-rights report came out. Jack Heretik at the Washington Free Beacon pointed out that Kosinski did it again on Thursday, or World Press Freedom Day, suggesting that any charge of "fake news" is somehow "misinformation." But Kosinski faked her own news back on the Today show in 200x.



One of the more annoying double standards displayed by the left-leaning press is how they ask genuine follow-up questions of Republicans and conservatives who try to dodge their questions, while letting Democrats and liberals slide when they engage in similar behavior. A perfect example of this occurred Sunday on NBC's Meet the Press, when, prompted by a Latino Victory Fund ad portraying supporters of Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Ed Gillespie as murderous, Confederate flag-waving. pickup truck-driving racists, Chuck Todd asked DNC chair Tom Perez if he believes all pickup truck owners really are racist — and then let him slide without getting a definitive "yes" or "no."



Immigration is the issue where the New York Times’ liberal lean is most obvious, a truth underlined in Friday’s edition, showing the paper still grieving over President Trump’s decision to eliminate the unilateral, constitutionally dubious Obama administration diktat, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which temporarily protected from deportation illegals who came to the United States as children. 



For two days running, the front page of the New York Times has delivered Democratic talking points about President Trump’s new tax cut plans. The banner over Thursday’s front page said it all, in big bold letters: “Tax Overhaul Would Aid Wealthiest.” The coverage lacked the vital context, pointed out by James Piereson in the Weekly Standard this week, that taxes have already been slashed for the poor and middle class, and it’s hard to structure a tax cut that doesn’t “favor the wealthy” in raw monetary terms. 



Next Sunday’s New York Times Sunday Magazine will feature a long essay by left-wing historian Rick Perlstein: “I Thought I Understood the American Right. Trump Proved Me Wrong.” Approach with caution, warn two prominent conservative writers. National Review's Jonah Goldberg warns: “Perlstein’s essay offers a really good insight into how the Times has jettisoned so much credibility in the age of Trump.”



As if trying to poison the Potomac water for the new president on his first day in office, the New York Times Inauguration Day off-lead story tried to wrong-foot Trump the moment he takes his hand off the Bible: “With an Oath, Complications In Hotel Lease – Ethical ‘Minefield’ for the President-Elect” by Eric Lipton and Susanne Craig. The jump-page headline, “At Trump Hotel in Washington, Champagne Toasts in an Ethical ‘Minefield.’” The online teaser was blunt: “From the moment he is sworn in, Mr. Trump may be in violation of a lease with the federal government.” Less-hostile explanations were ignored.